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Stampa
 
Aula Magna
Aula 211
Aula 201
Aula Malliani
Aula Crociera
Aula 113
10.00 - 13.00
Apertura Segreteria e Registrazione
13.00 - 13.30
13.30 - 15.30
15.30 - 16.00
16.00 - 16.45
PTS (Patto Trasversale per la Scienza) Meeting
 
 

Pre-Conference advanced course

Viral reservoir as obstacle to cure
 
Artistic contest RaccontART HIV - Incontro con le scuole finaliste
 

Pre-Conference advanced course

Ageing with HIV infection: new scenarios and new challenges
 

Pre-Conference advanced course

Prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs)
 

Pre-Conference advanced course

HIV and chronic viral hepatitis: the strategic role of the nurse
17.00 - 20.45

Aula Magna

ICAR 2019 Opening Session

17.00 - 17.30: Introducing ICAR 2019
Welcome Addresses

17:30 - 17:50: RaccontART HIV contest Awards

17:50 - 18:50: The centrality of the person between care and culture

18:50 - 19:05: Il sorriso di Andrea

19:05 - 20:05: Keynote Lectures

20:05 - 20:30: ICAR-CROI Awards 2019 for young Italian HIV investigators

20:30 - 20:45: Closing Remarks

20.45 - 22.30

Cortile d'Onore dell'Università

ICAR 2019 Welcome Reception
  • Aula Magna
    13.00-15.30

    Special event

    PTS (Patto Trasversale per la Scienza) Meeting

    PTS (Patto Trasversale per la Scienza) Meeting

    16.00-16.45

    Con la sponsorizzazione non condizionante di:

    Towards cure programs in HIV and HBV

    There were approximately 36.9 million people living with HIV at the end of 2017 with 1.8 million people becoming newly infected in 2017 globally. There is no cure for HIV infection but effective ARV drugs can control the virus and help prevent transmission. An estimated 257 million people are living with HBV infection around the world. Similarly, current HBV treatments suppress HBV viral replication but do not completely clear the virus. Today researchers are committed to develop innovative therapies to achieve functional cure for patients: the symposium will address the expectancies of the scientific community and the update of the ongoing projects in HIV and HBV cure research.

    Chairs: A. Gori, G. Tambussi

    16.00 - 16.05 Introduction
    A. Gori
    16.05 - 16.15 The expectations from the point of view of the clinician
    G.C. Marchetti
    16.15 - 16.35 The scientific efforts in cure programs
    B. Moldt
    16.35 - 16.45 Discussion on Symposium issues
    17.30-20.45

    ICAR 2019 Opening Session

    17.00 - 17.15: Introducing ICAR 2019
    Welcome Addresses

    17:30 - 17:50: RaccontART HIV contest Awards

    17:50 - 18:50: The centrality of the person between care and culture

    18:50 - 19:05: Il sorriso di Andrea

    19:05 - 20:05: Keynote Lectures

    20:05 - 20:30: ICAR-CROI Awards 2019 for young Italian HIV investigators

    20:30 - 20:45: Closing Remarks

    ICAR 2019 Opening Session

    17.00 - 17.30 Introducing ICAR 2019
    Chairs: A. Castagna, A. d'Arminio Monforte, M. Puoti, G. Rizzardini
    17.00 - 17.15 Introducing ICAR 2019
    17.15 - 17.30 Welcome Addresses: Magnifico Rettore, Università degli Studi di Milano
    E. Franzini
    17.30 - 17.50 RaccontART HIV contest Awards
    Chairs: M. Errico, M. Galli
    17.50 - 18.50 The centrality of the person between care and culture
    Chairs: A. Castagna, A. d'Arminio Monforte, M. Puoti, G. Rizzardini
    17.50 - 17.55 Introduction
    17.55 - 18.10 The commitment of the city of Milan
    P. Majorino, Assessore alle Politiche sociali e Cultura della salute, Comune di Milano
    Introduced by
    Maria Rosaria Iardino, Milano
    18.10 - 18.30 Lecture of his most reverend excellence, the Archbishop of Milan
    Monsignor M. Delpini, Arcivescovo metropolita di Milano
    18.30 - 18.50 The contemporaneity of Leonardo da Vinci
    F. Galli, Direttore Generale del Museo Nazionale Scienza e Tecnologia Leonardo da Vinci, Milano
    18.50 - 19.05 Il sorriso di Andrea
    Chair: R. Cauda, M. Zazzi
    19.05 - 20.05 Keynote Lectures
    Chairs: G. Ippolito, A. Lazzarin, F. von Schloesser
    19.05 - 19.15 Introduction
    G. Ippolito, A. Lazzarin
    19.15 - 19.40 Mauro Moroni Memorial Lecture "HIV Cure"
    S.G. Deeks
    19.40 - 19.45 Introduction
    F. von Schloesser
    19.45 - 20.05 The Fourth Decade in HIV: new challenges
    G.V. Calvino
    20.05 - 20.30 ICAR-CROI Awards 2019 for young Italian HIV investigators
    Chairs: G. Angarano, A. Antinori, G. Silvestri
    Selected Italian Investigators

    INI-resistance dynamics from 2007 to 2017 in Italian clinical isolates
    D. Armenia Tor Vergata University of Rome – MENTORS F. Ceccherini-Silberstein, M. Santoro

    GSS of NRTI-backbone predicts time to virological failure of INI-based regimens
    A. Borghetti Cattolica del Sacro Cuore University of Rome – MENTOR S. Di Giambenedetto

    Quantification of CD64: a predictive biomarker for progression to active tuberculosis
    C. Ceriani ASST Ovest Milanese, Legnano (MI) – MENTOR P. Clerici

    Subclinical tubular impairment is common in ART-treated HIV+ patients in Uganda
    C. Costa Amedeo di Savoia Hospital, Turin – MENTOR A. Calcagno

    Evolution and reversibility of renal function after switch from TDF to TAF regimens
    R. Gagliardini National Institute for Infectious Diseases “L. Spallanzani”, Rome – MENTOR A. Antinori

    Impact of HBCAB+ on advanced liver fibrosis development in HIV-HBV infected patients
    V. Malagnino Tor Vergata University of Rome – MENTOR L. Sarmati

    Metabolomic profiling of HIV patients with and without HIV-associated dementia
    A. Mastrangelo Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan – MENTOR P. Cinque

    Extracellular vesicle–associated cytokines in HIV-infected human ex vivo tonsils
    V. Mercurio University of Milan – MENTORS M. Biasin, L. Margolis

    HCV late relapse in patients with directly acting antiviral–related SVR 12
    C. Minichini Luigi Vanvitelli, University of Naples – MENTOR N. Coppola

    Effectiveness of single- vs multiple-tablet regimens as 1st-line ART in ICONA cohort
    A. Mondi National Institute for Infectious Diseases “L. Spallanzani”, Rome – MENTOR A. Antinori

    Modulation of gut microbiota improves mucosal permeability in HIV+ patients
    C. Pinacchio Sapienza University of Rome – MENTOR G. d’Ettorre

    Interferon-free regimens improve renal function in patients with chronic Hepatitis C
    F. Portunato Luigi Vanvitelli, University of Naples – MENTOR N. Coppola

    Genotypic and phenotypic susceptibility to fostemsavir in multidrug-resistant HIV-1
    F. Saladini University of Siena – MENTOR M. Zazzi

    In vitro activity of DTG/BIC/E/CAB on first-generation INSTI-resistant HIV-1
    F. Saladini University of Siena – MENTOR M. Zazzi

    ERAP2 administration reduces in vitro PBMC susceptibility to HIV-1-infection
    I. Saulle University of Milan – MENTOR M. Biasin

    Time to undetectable viral load achievement after ART start and risk of mortality
    V. Spagnuolo Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan – MENTOR A. Castagna

    Increased SAMHD1 correlates with ISGs in HIV-1–infected patients
    M. Statzu Sapienza University of Rome – MENTOR C. Scagnolari

    Alzheimer’s dementia cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in HIV-positive patients on cART
    M. Trunfio University of Turin – MENTOR A. Calcagno

    Relapse of symptomatic CSF HIV escape upon previously optimized cART regimen changes
    F. Turrini IRCCS San Raffaele Hospital, Milan – MENTOR P. Cinque

    Low performance of the oraquick HCV rapid antibody test in HIV/HCV-infected people
    S. Vita S.M. Goretti Hospital, Latina – MENTOR M. Lichtner

    20.30 - 20.45 Closing Remarks
    Chairs: A. Castagna, A. d'Arminio Monforte, M. Puoti, G. Rizzardini
    09.00-10.00 Keynote Lectures

    Keynote Lectures

    Chairs: G. Ippolito, A. Lazzarin, F. von Schloesser

    19.05 - 19.15 Introduction
    G. Ippolito, A. Lazzarin
    19.15 - 19.40 Mauro Moroni Memorial Lecture HIV Cure
    S.G. Deeks
    19.45 - 20.05 The Fourth Decade in HIV: new challenges
    G.V. Calvino
    17.00 - 17.15 ICAR 2019 Closing Remarks

    Closing Remarks

    Chairs: A. Castagna, A. d'Arminio Monforte, M. Puoti, G. Rizzardini

  • Aula 211
    13.30-16.00

    Pre-Conference advanced course

    Viral reservoir as obstacle to cure

    Pre-Conference advanced course

    Viral reservoir as obstacle to cure

    The persistence of the viral reservoir is still the main obstacle to the eradication of HIV infection. The availability of new high-sensitivity techniques of investigation has allowed to increase the ability to characterize the reservoir, but leaving open questions about the reliability of the methods and the clinical significance of generated data. The course aims to present the current status of technologies potential aimed at the qualitative and quantitative assessment of reservoir in the patient follow-up, and deepen the current therapeutic strategies to limit the extent of viral reservoir as the first approach to HIV cure. Attendees will be involved with a questionnaire to evaluate the perception of the usefulness of some diagnostic tests or clinical markers for the patient's routine follow-up. The results of the survey will be discussed at the end of the course.

    Chairs: F. Bai, F. Saladini

    13.30 - 14.00 Measuring the reservoir today
    M. Santoro
    14.00 - 14.30 Evolution of reservoir during the infection: immunological aspects
    A. Bandera
    14.30 - 15.00 Evolution of reservoir during the infection: virological aspects
    F. Ceccherini - Silberstein
    15.00 - 15.30 Antiretrovirals distribution in sanctuaries
    A. Calcagno
    15.30 - 16.00 Discussion of survey results and conclusions
  • Aula 201
    13.30-16.00

    Special event

    Artistic contest RaccontART HIV - Incontro con le scuole finaliste

    Artistic contest RaccontART HIV - Incontro con le scuole finaliste

    Moderatori: A. Di Biagio, M. Errico, D. Mainieri

    13.30 - 13.40 Benvenuto dei Presidenti ICAR
    13.40 - 14.10 Introduzione, obiettivi dell'incontro, presentazione della Giuria Artistica e Scientifica
    A. Di Biagio, M. Errico, D. Mainieri
    14.10 - 15.50 Presentazione delle Opere finaliste al Concorso a cura degli Istituti Scolastici
    15.50 - 16.00 Conclusioni
    A. Di Biagio, M. Errico, D. Mainieri
  • Aula Malliani
    13.30-16.00

    Pre-Conference advanced course

    Ageing with HIV infection: new scenarios and new challenges

    Pre-Conference advanced course

    Ageing with HIV infection: new scenarios and new challenges

    By 2030, 70% of HIV-infected patients will be 50 years of age or older and one third of people living with HIV will have at least three age-related comorbidities. In light of this changing epidemiology, HIV providers must recognize and manage this new picture of the disease. In addition to multiple comorbidities, the ageing HIV population is at risk for geriatric syndromes, such as frailty, falls, delirium and functional impairment. It is therefore necessary to adopt a multidisciplinary approach to the patient and a proactive management of comorbidities. Nevertheless, in the elderly subject with HIV infection, the personalization of antiretroviral therapy, which must be based on an in-depth knowledge of the characteristics of antiretroviral drugs, drug interactions with concomitant therapy and patient's clinical characteristics, is even more important.

    Chairs: A. Mondi, V. Spagnuolo

      Epidemiological data
    13.30 - 14.00 Ageing with HIV: current and future size of an epidemic
    G. Madeddu
      Pathogenetic bases
    14.00 - 14.30 Immunosenescence and inflammaging: from basic research to clinic
    G. d'Ettorre
      Clinical aspects
    14.30 - 15.00 Diagnosis and screening of frailty in ageing with HIV Infection
    G. Guaraldi
    15.00 - 15.30 Diagnosis and screening of neurocognitive disease in HIV
    P.M. Cinque
    15.30 - 16.00 Managing polypharmacy in elderly patient
    C. Gervasoni
  • Aula Crociera
    13.30-16.00

    Pre-Conference advanced course

    Prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs)

    Pre-Conference advanced course

    Prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs)

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are infections that are passed from one person to another through sexual contact. Antibiotics can treat STDs caused by bacteria, yeast, or parasites; for this correct diagnosis and treatment are crucial. PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) has been shown to reduce the risk of HIV infection in people who are at high risk by up to 92% when taken consistently. Italian regulatory agency approved use of PrEP. This course is focused on STDs diagnosis and treatment and on PrEP request and management in clinical practice.

    Chairs: A. Muscatello, S. Nozza, R. Rossotti

    13.30 - 13.50 The current management of sexually transmitted diseases
    M. Cusini
    13.50 - 14.10 The support of the laboratory in STDs early diagnosis
    M.A. Latino
    14.10 - 14.30 Indications and clinical implications of vaccinations against STDs
    M. Orso
    14.30 - 14.45 The role of counselor and cultural mediator in prevention
    G. Fracca
    14.45 - 15.00 The PrEP clinic in hospital
    R. Bellagamba
    15.00 - 15.15 The PrEP clinic in check points
    L. Badia
    15.15 - 16.00 Discussion on Course issues
  • Aula 113
    13.30-16.00

    Pre-Conference advanced course

    HIV and chronic viral hepatitis: the strategic role of the nurse

    Pre-Conference advanced course

    HIV and chronic viral hepatitis: the strategic role of the nurse

    The current management of HIV-HCV co-infected patient in the clinic today requires more than ever, due to the characteristics of complexity, a management based on close medical-nurse collaboration and team-based approach to the patient. We will therefore define the role of the nurse in relation to the patient's helping relationship with new disease response and support for adherence to therapy, knowledge of HIV and HCV drugs and the role of the nurse in clinical research.

    Chairs: A.M. Bigoloni, V. Picciotto, C. Uberti Foppa

    13.30 - 14.00 Communication of diagnosis and management of disease chronicity: the point of view of the patient and the operator
    C. Ruggieri
    14.00 - 14.30 New anti-HIV and HCV drugs: interactions and undesirable effects
    T. Angelini Zucchetti
    14.30 - 15.00 Health counseling and adherence to therapy
    V. Picciotto
    15.00 - 15.30 Role of the nurse in clinical trial
    D.F. Manara
    15.30 - 16.00 Discussion on Course issues
  • Cortile d'Onore dell'Università
    20.45-22.30 ICAR 2019 Welcome Reception

    ICAR 2019 Welcome Reception

 
Aula Magna
Aula 211
Aula 201
Aula Malliani
09.00 - 10.00

Aula Magna

Keynote Lectures
10.05 - 11.35
11.40 - 12.40
12.40 - 13.10
13.15 - 14.00
14.05 - 14.50
14.55 - 16.25
16.30 - 17.30
17.30 - 18.00

Andrea De Luca Symposium

Facing Resistance in 2019

Symposium

New options for treating opportunistic infections in immunocompromised host
 

Symposium

Critical issues in ART

Renato Dalle Nogare Symposium

Global Health: disease burden, migration and ageing

Oral Communications

Challenges in HCV elimination

Oral Communications

A Healthy Brain in People Living with HIV

Poster Discussion

Social Science and management of HIV beyond antiretroviral therapy

Poster Discussion

Clinical HIV and Epidemiology

Oral Communications

Targetting 90-90-90

Oral Communications

Immunological insights of HIV infection

Oral Communications

New insights in HIV pathogenesis

Oral Communications

Let's PrEP now: Italian experiences

Oral Communications

Cancers and bacterial infections
 
  • Aula Magna
    09.00-10.00 Keynote Lectures

    Keynote Lectures

    Chairs: A. Cossarizza, M. Galli, B. Suligoi

    09.00 - 09.30 Exploiting HIV for the gene therapy of inherited diseases and cancer
    L. Naldini
    09.30 - 10.00 Looking to a future management of HIV patients: key elements for transition
    A. Antinori
    10.05-11.35

    Andrea De Luca Symposium

    Facing Resistance in 2019

    Andrea De Luca Symposium

    Facing Resistance in 2019

    Back in 1996 drug resistance was a terrible occurrence and the few pharmaceutical options we had at that time were fading away with just some codon changes. Nowadays, the picture has dramatically changed and multiple therapeutic strategies have been developed combining antivirals, immunological therapies, and vaccines. Nevertheless, there is still an occasion to think globally about Drug Resistance, in the recent past with some fundamental mutations, with newer approaches, and with a deeper look into reservoirs.

    Chairs: M. Andreoni, B. Rossetti, M. Zazzi

    10.05 - 10.20 Global epidemiology of HIV resistance and clinical relevance
    C.F. Perno
    10.20 - 10.35 Remembering M184V
    S. Rusconi
    10.35 - 10.50 Overcoming resistance: the role of monoclonal antibodies
    N. Gianotti
    10.50 - 11.05 Drug resistance in sanctuary sites
    S. Bonora
    11.05 - 11.35 Discussion on Symposium issues
    11.40-13.10

    Symposium

    New options for treating opportunistic infections in immunocompromised host

    Symposium

    New options for treating opportunistic infections in immunocompromised host

    Advanced HIV patients have with significant frequency classical opportunistic infections but also healthcare-related infections caused by multiresistant bacteria or yeasts. In the recent years healthcare-related and opportunistic infections in HIV-negative population had triggered the need to expand the therapeutic armamentarium with new drugs, characterized by a broader spectrum of action and/or less toxicity and more convenience. The indication for these drugs and the new perspectives offered by the anti-infective drugs pipelines must be part of the cultural background of the clinician who takes care of HIV patients.

    Chairs: G. Carosi, R. Cauda, D.M. Cirillo

    11.40 - 11.55 Innovation in diagnosis and treatment of CMV infection
    L. Sarmati
    11.55 - 12.10 Difficult to treat bacterial infections and immunodeficiencies
    M. Venditti
    12.10 - 12.25 Fungal infections: latest in prevention and management
    P. Viale
    12.25 - 12.40 Facing Mycobacteria in 2019
    L. Codecasa
    12.40 - 13.10 Discussion on Symposium issues
    13.15-14.00

    Con il supporto di:

    2DR: from opportunity to change of paradigm

    PLHIV are aware of the potential long-term risks of current ART therapies that in any case allow a control of viremia and a normal life expectancy. Dolutegravir represented a breakthrough therapy in HIV, demonstrated by 5 studies of superiority and by the recognition of an innovative product by the Italian regulatory agency, offering PLWH valid therapeutic options. Thanks to the results obtained in triple therapies, dolutegravir was subsequently studied in robust 2-drug studies that allows to question the current twenty-year paradigm of the 3 drug regimens. Today, 2-Drug regimens have been proposed, ensuring the same efficacy and safety of a 3 drug regimen to reduce patient exposure to ARVs and potential associated toxicities since from naïve patient.

    Chair: A. d'Arminio Monforte

    13.15 - 13.30 The effectiveness of dolutegravir: From the three drugs regimen to the two drug regimen
    A. Antinori
    13.30 - 13.45 Dolutegravir: the importance of the high barrier to resistance
    M. Zazzi
    13.45 - 14.00 Discussion on Symposium issues
    14.55-16.25

    Symposium

    Critical issues in ART

    Symposium

    Critical issues in ART

    Despite the evident success of ART, with almost all patients attaining virological suppression, many issues remain only partially addressed. For instance, too many patients withdraw from treatment and can thus transmit HIV infection and adolescents that have been infected vertically must face HIV infection and its management in a very critical phase of their lives.  Furthermore, there are still some shadow areas about the long-term efficacy of two-drugs regimens, and, while the toxicity of new ART regimens is certainly lower from that of the old ones, new regimens may not be free from not yet well defined adverse effects.

    Chairs: G. Angarano, T. Bini, G. Di Perri

    14.55 - 15.10 Lost in follow-up
    E. Girardi
    15.10 - 15.25 Growing with ART
    V. Giacomet
    15.25 - 15.40 Toxicity: one step forward, one step back
    P. Bonfanti
    15.40 - 16.00 2DR - 3DR: two points of view
    S. Di Giambenedetto, S. Lo Caputo
    16.00 - 16.25 Discussion on Symposium issues
    16.30-18.00

    Renato Dalle Nogare Symposium

    Global Health: disease burden, migration and ageing

    Renato Dalle Nogare Symposium

    Global Health: disease burden, migration and ageing

    HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, is one of the world's most serious public health challenges. According to UNAIDS, there were approximately 36.9 million people worldwide living with HIV/AIDS in 2017. In 2017, 21.7 million people living with HIV (59%) were accessing antiretroviral therapy globally, an increase of 2.3 million since 2016 and up from 8 million in 2010. AIDS-related deaths have been reduced by more than 51% since the peak in 2004. This unprecedented global response to the AIDS pandemic can serve as a paradigm for the response to other global health threats. The aim of this symposium is to describe how AIDS invented Global Health.

    Chairs: S. Babudieri, C. Giaquinto, T.S. Prestileo

    16.30 - 16.45 The global answer to HIV: how to win the war
    S. Vella
    16.45 - 17.00 Ageing as global health challenge
    R. Bernabei
    17.00 - 17.15 Migrant as global health challenge
    C. Nicoara
    17.15 - 17.30 End TB globally
    M. Raviglione
    17.30 - 18.00 Discussion on Symposium issues
  • Aula 211
    10.05-11.35

    Oral Communications

    Challenges in HCV elimination

    Oral Communications

    Challenges in HCV elimination

    Chairs: N. Coppola, C. Ferrari, T.A. Santantonio

    10.05 - 10.20 Diagnosis and management of NASH/NAFLD
    L.V. Valenti
    10.20 - 10.30 OC 1Screening strategies for hepatitis C virus elimination in Italy
    L.A. Kondili1, M.G. Quaranta1, A. Marcellusi2, A. Craxi3, M. Puoti4, I. Gamkrelidze5, S. Blach5, H. Razavi5, F.S. Mennini2, and PITER Collaborating Group*
    1Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy, 2University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 3University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy, 4Niguarda Hospital, Milan, Italy, 5Center for Disease Analysis Foundation, Lafayette, United States, *available at www.progettopiter.it/rete.aspx
    10.32 - 10.42 OC 2Prevalence of HBV, HCV and HIV virus infections in a cohort of migrants in southern Italy
    C. Monari1,2, L.Onorato2,3,4, L. Alessio1,3,4, G. Di Caprio2,3,4, L. Surace5, M. Starace2, C. Sagnelli2,3,6, L. Gualdieri7, M. Pisaturo2,3,4, G. Scotto8, S. Curto9, M. Macera2,3,4, N. Coppola1,2
    1Infectious Diseases Unit, AORN Sant’Anna and San Sebastiano, Caserta, 2Department of Mental Health and Public Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, Naples, 3Medical Center, Caserta, 4Medical Center, “Abraham’s Tent”, Caserta, 5Medical Center Lamezia Terme – Catanzaro Lido – Soverato, 6Medical Center, “Charity Nuns”, Naples, 7ASL Napoli 1, Ascalesi Hospital, Naples, 8Infectious Diseases Unit, Foggia, 9Medical Center, Potenza
    10.44 - 10.54 OC 3HCV test and treat in two Milan prison institutions: an effective strategy to achieve micro-elimination
    R. Giuliani1, T. Sebastiani1, V. Casigliani2, G. Arzilli2, G. Scardina2, E. Freo1, L. Tavoschi2, R. Ranieri1
    1Infectious Diseases Service, Penitentiary Health System, San Paolo University Hospital, Milano, Italy, 2Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy
    10.56 - 11.06 OC 4Efficacy and tolerability of DAAs in HCV-monoinfected and HCV/HIV-coinfected patients with psychiatric disorders
    N. de Gennaro, L. Diella, E. Milano, L. Monno, G. Angarano, M. Milella, A. Saracino
    Clinica Malattie Infettive, Università di Bari
    11.08 - 11.18 OC 5Road to HCV elimination in HIV/HCV coinfected patients by screening and universal access to DAA: baseline data from the first screening of NoCo (No Coinfection) study
    A. d’Arminio Monforte1, A. Tavelli2, A. Cozzi-Lepri3, S. Cicalini4, A. Calcagno5, R. Rossotti6, E. Grilli4, F. Bai1, E. Quiros-Roldan7, E. Girardi8, A. Antinori4, M. Puoti6 for the NoCo Study of the Icona cohort
    1ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, University of Milan, Clinic of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Dept of Health Sciences, Milan, Italy, 2Icona Foundation, Milan, Italy, 3Institute for Global Health, University College of London, London, UK, 4Clinical Division of HIV/AIDS, INMI “L. Spallanzani” IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 5Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Siences, Amedeo di Savoia Hospital, University of Torino, Torino, Italy, 6ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda Division of Infectious Diseases, Milan Italy, 7Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, University of Brescia, ASST Spedali Civili Hospital, Brescia, Italy, 8Clinical Epidemiology Unit, INMI “L. Spallanzani” IRCCS, Rome, Italy
    11.20 - 11.30 OC 6Analysis of baseline factors associated with treatment outcome in HCV-infected patients starting a first- line DAA-treatment containing a NS5A inhibitor: particular focus on natural resistance
    S. Barbaliscia1, V.C. Di Maio1, E. Teti2, M. Aragri1, S. Paolucci3, C. Masetti4, R. D’Ambrosio5, E Degasperi5, E. Polilli6, V. Pace Palitti7, G. Fiorentino8, L. Foroghi2, V. Cento9, R. Scutari1, B. Bruzzone10, V. Calvaruso11, N. Coppola12, G.B. Gaeta12, G. Morsica13, T. Ruggiero14, V. Ghisetti14, A. Bertoli1 , M. Milana4, L.A. Nicolini15, W. Gennari16, S. Galli17, C.F. Magni18, V. Micheli19, A. Lleo20, A. Aghemo20, R. Maserati21, S Bonora22, N. Iapadre23, F. Morisco24, M. Siciliano25, V. Guarneri26, B. Rossetti27, M. Lichtner28, V. Borghi29, T. Pollicino30, C. Caudai31, L. Sarmati2, M. Puoti32, A. Pellicelli33, S. Babudieri34, G. Rizzardini18, G. Taliani35, G. Parruti6, M. Zazzi36, P. Lampertico5, G. Raimondo30, C. Pasquazzi8, M. Angelico4, F. Baldanti3, M. Andreoni2, C.F. Perno37, A. Craxì11, F. Ceccherini-Silberstein1 on behalf of HCV Virology Italian Resistance Network (Vironet C)
    1Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Rome "Tor Vergata", Rome,Italy, 2Infectious Diseases Unit, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome, Italy, 3Molecular Virology Unit, Microbiology and Virology Departmentt, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy, 4Hepatology Unit, University Hospital of Rome“TorVergata”, Rome,Italy, 5“A.M. e A. Migliavacca" Center for Liver Diseases, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 6Infectious Diseases Unit, Pescara General Hospital, Pescara, Italy, 7Hepatology Unit, Pescara General Hospital, Pescara, Italy, 8Infectious Diseases Unit, Sant’Andrea Hospital–“Sapienza”University, Rome, Italy, 9Residency program in Microbiology and Virology, Università degli Studi di Milano. Milan, Italy, 10Hygiene Unit, IRCCSAOU San Martino-IST, Genoa, Italy, 11Gastroenterology,“P.Giaccone” University Hospital, Palermo, Italy, 12Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Mental and Physical Health and Preventive Medicine, University of Campania L. Vanvitelli, Naples, Italy, 13Division of Infectious Diseases, IRCCS, Ospedale San Raffaele, Milan, Italy, 14Laboratory of Microbiology and Virology,“Amedeo di Savoia” Hospital, ASL, Città di Torino,Turin, Italy, 15Infectious Diseases Unit, IRCCSAOU San Martino-IST, Genoa, Italy, 16Microbiology and Virology Unit, University Hospital Policlinico of Modena, Modena, Italy, 17Microbiology and Virology Unit, Sant’Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna; Italy, 181st Division of Infectious Diseases, ASST Fatebene fratelli Sacco, Milan,Italy, 19Clinical Microbiology, Virology and Bioemergencies, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco, Milan, Italy, 20Department of Internal Medicine, Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, Milan, Italy, 21Institute of Infectious Diseases, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy, 22Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Torino, Torino, Italy, 23Infectious Diseases Unit, S.Salvatore Hospital, L'Aquila, Italy, 24Gastroenterology, «FedericoII» University, Naples, Italy, 25Gastroenterology, Catholic University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 26Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy, 27Infectious Diseases Unit, AOU Senese, Siena, Italy, 28Infectious Diseases Unit,“Sapienza”University, Polo pontino, Latina, Italy, 29Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Modena School of Medicine,Italy, 30Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Messina, Messina, Italy, 31Department of Medical Biotechnology, University of Siena, Siena, Italy, 32Hospital Niguarda Ca’Granda, Milan, Italy, 33Hepatology Unit, San Camillo Forlanini Hospital, Rome, Italy, 34Medical, Surgical and Experimental Sciences, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy, 35Infectious and Tropical Diseases Unit, Department of Clinical Medicine, “La Sapienza” University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 36Department of Medical Biotechnology, University of Siena, Siena, Italy, 37Department of Oncology and Oncohematology, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
    11.40-13.10

    Oral Communications

    A Healthy Brain in People Living with HIV

    Oral Communications

    A Healthy Brain in People Living with HIV

    Chairs: A.M. Cattelan, G. Lapadula, R. Maserati

    11.40 - 11.50 OC 14Comparative neuropsychiatric toxicity profile of dolutegravir (DTG)-based versus efavirenz (EFV)-based versus other recommend first-line antiretroviral therapies (ART): data from Icona Foundation Study Cohort
    A. Mondi1, A. Cozzi-Lepri2, A. Cingolani3, A. Tavelli4, M. Puoti5, V. Barocci6, A. Londero7, F. Bai8, C. Pinnetti1, P. Cinque9, A. d’Arminio Monforte8, A. Antinori1 on behalf of the Icona Foundation Study Group
    1HIV/AIDS Department, National Institute for Infectious Diseases "Lazzaro Spallanzani" IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 2Centre for Clinical Research, Epidemiology, Modelling and Evaluation (CREME), Institute for Global Health, UCL, London, UK, 3Infectious Diseases Unit, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy, 4Icona Foundation, Milan, Italy, 5Infectious Diseases Department, ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milano, Italy, 6Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Dept. of Biomedical Sciences and Public Health, Polytechnic University of Marche, Ancona, Italy, 7Infectious Diseases Clinic, Department of Medicine University of Udine and Azienda Sanitaria Universitaria Integrata di Udine, Udine, Italy, 8Clinic of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Department of Health Sciences, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 9Department of Infectious Diseases, San Raffaele Hospital, Vita-Salute University, Milan, Italy
    11.52 - 12.02 OC 15Neurocognitive Impairment (NCI) is not associated with Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors (INSTIs) use in HIV positive persons (PLWH)
    A. Mondi, A.C. Brita, P. Lorenzini, A. Vergori, R. Gagliardini, V. Mazzotta, S. Cicalini, R. Bellagamba, A. Antinori, C. Pinnetti
    HIV/AIDS Department, National Institute for Infectious Diseases “Lazzaro Spallanzani”, IRCCS, Rome Italy
    12.04 - 12.14 OC 16Central Nervous System Efficacy of Dual versus Triple Antiretroviral Therapy in a real-life setting
    M. Trunfio1, D. Vai2, E. Borgogno1, V. Pirriatore1, M.C. Tettoni1, D. Imperiale2, G. Di Perri1, S. Bonora1, A. Calcagno1
    1Unit of Infectious Diseases, Amedeo di Savoia hospital, University of Torino, Torino, Italy, 2Unit of Neurology, Maria Vittoria hospital, Torino, Italy
    12.16 - 12.26 OC 17Mini-Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination versus International HIV-Dementia Scale for current HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders
    M. Trunfio1, D. Vai2, M. Milesi1, A. Trentalange1, S. Audagnotto1, G. Orofino3, D. Imperiale2, S. Bonora1, G. Di Perri1, A. Calcagno1
    1Unit of Infectious Diseases, Amedeo di Savoia hospital, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, Italy, 2Unit of Neurology, Maria Vittoria hospital, ASL Città di Torino, Turin, Italy, 3Unit of infectious Diseases, Amedeo di Savoia hospital, Divisione A, Turin, Italy
    12.28 - 12.38 OC 18Neuropsychological performance improves in fully virologically suppressed HIV-positive individuals
    A.C. Brita1, B. Milanini2, P. Lorenzini1, A. Mondi1, A. Vergori1, S. Menichetti1, R. Gagliardini1, A. Giannetti1, R. Bellagamba1, S. Cicalini1, A. Antinori1, C. Pinnetti1
    1HIV/AIDS Clinical Unit, INMI,Lazzaro Spallanzani, Rome, Italy, 2Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, California
    12.40 - 12.50 OC 19Frailty index (FI) and age predict neurocognitive functioning in a real life large prospective HIV+ cohort
    G. Guaraldi1, J. Milic1, L. Cysique2, A. Malagoli1, M.G. Corni1, E. Bardi1, F. Carli1, I. Franconi1, C. Mussini1, M. Bloch3
    1Modena HIV Metabolic Clinic, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 2Neuroscience Research Australia, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia, 3Holdsworth House Medical Practice, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    12.52 - 13.02 OC 20Changes over time in clinical and laboratory features and correlates of survival of HIV-associated Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy
    I. Mainardi1, A.G. Tarantino2, R. Caccia3, F. Turrini3, F. Ferretti1, A. Bestetti1, A. Lazzarin1, P. Cinque1,3
    1Department of Infectious Diseases, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano, 2Department of Research, Manima, Assistance and Healthcare Organization, Milano, 3Neurovirology Unit, Division of Immunology, Transplantation and Infectious Diseases, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano
    13.15-14.45

    Poster Discussion

    Social Science and management of HIV beyond antiretroviral therapy

    Poster Discussion

    Social Science and management of HIV beyond antiretroviral therapy

    Chairs: A. Bignardi, B.M. Celesia

    13.15 - 13.20 PD 1Educational projects in schools: a retrospective analysis of a 15-year activity
    E. Mozzo1, V. Ortolan1, C. Novello1, F. Batterman2, N. Gatti2, M. Crimaudo2, C. Guaquinto1
    1Fondazione Penta, Padova, 2Associazione C.A.S.A., Padova
    13.23 - 13.28 PD 2A survey as a chance of education on U=U in PLWHIVA
    G. Orofino1, S. Patrucco2, P. Altini3, G.L. Cipero2, A. Perziano2, C. Owen2, M. Gay4
    1Ospedale Amedeo di Savoia, Torino, 2Associazione Arcobaleno AIDS, Torino, 3Dipartimento di Scienze della Sanità Pubblica e Pediatriche, Torino, 4Ospedale SS.Antonio e Biagio e Cesare Arrigo, Alessandria
    13.31 - 13.36 PD 3Testing MSM in cruising venues
    D. Zagato, A. Andolina, L. Beltrami, A. Bianchi, C. Ferrara, E. Garavaglia, V. La Monica, S. Lolli, L. Londei, F. Maddaloni, M. Manfredini, V. Nicotera, D. Pennisi, A. Pezzotti, M. Pierini, F. Poletti, F. Riili, C. Romero, J. Scalisi, P. Testoni, L. Valpreda, P. Vinti, A. Ünlü, M. Zoia, M. Cernuschi
    ASA Associazione Solidarietà AIDS, Milan
    13.39 - 13.44 PD 4Not only MSM: women and HIV test in a community-based site
    A. Bianchi, F.M. Esposito, A. Antonino, G. Fracca, M. Lanza, F. Rossi, J.G. Scalisi, R. Repossi, P. Testoni, D. Zagato, M. Cernuschi
    ASA, Associazione Solidarietà AIDS Onlus, Milan, Italy
    13.47 - 13.52 PD 5Clinical research integrated with narrative-based research to understand living and managing HIV: TMC114FD1HTX4011 - DIAMANTE study
    A. Antinori1, A. Vergori1, M. Camici1, V. Esposito2, M.A. Carleo2, P. Rosario2, M. Andreoni3, V. Malagnino3, L. Campogiani3, A. Cascio4, M. Trizzino4, G. Mazzola4, D. Ripamonti5, D. Valenti5, E. Manzillo6, T. Pizzella6, L. Aprea6, E. Focà7, A. Celotti7, A. Cappuccio8, L. Reale8, A. Uglietti9, D. Mancusi9, R. Termini9
    1HIV/AIDS Unit, National Institute for Infectious Diseases L. Spallanzani, IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 2General Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Infectious Disease and Infectious Emergencies, Cotugno Hospital, Naples, Italy, 3Infectious Diseases Clinic, Foundation Policlinico Tor Vergata University Hospital, Rome, Italy, 4Infectious Diseases Clinic, AOU Policlinico “P.Giaccone”, Palermo - Italy, 5Infectious Diseases Clinic, Papa Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Bergamo - Italy, 6UOS Infectious Disease and Infectious Emergencies, Azienda Ospedaliera dei Colli, Naples, Italy, 7Tropical and Infectious Diseases Clinic, ASST Spedali Civili di Brescia, University of Brescia, Brescia - Italy, 8ISTUD Foundation, Milan, Italy, 9Janssen-Cilag SpA, Cologno Monzese, Italy
    13.55 - 14.00 PD 6Integrated Protection for People Living with HIV in Angola (PIPSA) a Test/Treat/ Prevent HIV Program. Preliminary data
    L. Verzotti1,2, T. Baldoni1,2, S. Guedes1, E. Braganha de Nascimento1, J.C.G. Da Costa3, T. Chilumbo4, S.V. Loa5, G. Pellizzer6, Nigro1,6 for PIPSA Activists*
    1Protecção integral para o Paciente Seropositivo Angola (PIPSA), Luanda, Angola, 2Unione Medico Missionaria Italiana (UMMI), Verona, Italia, 3Repartição Municipal de Saúde do Municipio de Kilamba Kiaxi, Luanda, Angola, 4Direcção Provincial da Saúde de Luanda, Luanda, Angola, 5Hospital Divina Providência; 6Medici con l’Africa-Cuamm, Padova, Italia
    14.03 - 14.08 PD 7Retention in HAART among youth accessing SAAJ (Serviços Amigos dos Adolescentes e Jovens) in Beira, Mozambique
    C. Vitali1, G. Prennusci2, E. Namarime3, D. Pizzol4, G. Putoto5, L. Praticò6
    1University of Pavia, Pavia, 2University of Pavia, Pavia, 3Doctors with Africa CUAMM, Beira, 4Doctors with Africa CUAMM, Padova, 5Doctors with Africa CUAMM, Padova, 6Doctors with Africa CUAMM, Padova
    14.11 - 14.16 PD 8Implementation of HIV patients care through personalized exercise program
    P. Vassalini, E.N. Cavallari, L. Santinelli, C. Borrazzo, L. Celani, G.P. Innocenti, G. Ceccarelli, G. Tancredi, C. Mastroianni, V. Vullo, G. d'Ettorre
    Sapienza University of Rome, Rome
    14.19 - 14.24 PD 9In-hospital vaccination program for HIV positive patients: who are the unvaccinated individuals
    D. Barbanotti, L. Gazzola, A. De Bona, G. Ancona, F. Bai, S. Cianciola, K. Reister, P. Tognetti, C. Tincati, G. Marchetti, T. Bini, A. d’Arminio Monforte
    Department of Health Sciences, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, University of Milan, Italy
    14.27 - 14.32 PD 10Non-occupational Post-Exposure Prophylaxis: how everyday clinical practice complies with Guidelines recommendation?
    R. Rossotti, M. Cantone, L.G. Chianura, M.C. Moioli, S. Chiappetta, F. Crippa, M. Merli, D. Motta, C. Orcese, A. Pazzi, G. Travi, B.P. Vigo, M. Puoti
    Department of Infectious Diseases, ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milan
    14.55-16.25

    Poster Discussion

    Clinical HIV and Epidemiology

    Poster Discussion

    Clinical HIV and Epidemiology

    Chairs: A. De Maria, N. Petrosillo

    14.55 - 15.00 PD 11Dolutegravir-based antiretroviral regimens for HIV liver transplant patients in real life
    D. Cattaneo, S. Sollima, P. Meraviglia, L. Milazzo, D. Minisci, M. Fusi, C. Gervasoni
    ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco University Hospital, Milano
    15.03 - 15.08 PD 12High incidence and prevalence of syphilis among HIV-infected MSM in Thailand
    C. Muccini1,2, S. Pinyakorn3,4, C.J Kolsteeg5, E. Kroon2, C. Sacdalan2, P. Prueksakaew2, P. Phanuphak2, J. Ananworanich2,3,4, N. Phanuphak2, D. Colby2
    1Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy, 2SEARCH, The Thai Red Cross AIDS Research Centre, Bangkok, Thailand, 3U.S. Military HIV Research Program, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, USA, 4Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, Bethesda, USA, 5Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands
    15.11 - 15.16 PD 13Is HIV Sorted? Survey - Results Highlights for Italy
    B. Audoin1, R. Caldera2, M. Carlevari2, S. Head3, C. Zocchetti2, J. M. Zuniga4
    1International Association of Providers of AIDS Care (IAPAC), Paris, 2Gilead Sciences srl, Milan, 3Gilead Sciences Europe Ltd, Stockley Park, Uxbridge, 4International Association of Providers of AIDS Care (IAPAC), Washington DC
    15.19 - 15.24 PD 14Impact of HIV self-test (HIVST) implementation on new HIV diagnoses in Italy
    G. Chiradia1, A. Navarra1, S. Pittalis1, G. De Carli2, N. Orchi2, V. Puro2, E. Girardi1
    1Clinical Epidemiology Unit - National Institute for Infectious Diseases "L. Spallanzani" - IRCCS, Rome, 2AIDS Reference Center- National Institute for Infectious Diseases "L. Spallanzani" - IRCCS, Rome
    15.27 - 15.32 PD 15Test and treat: state of the art. Data from an Italian multicenter cohort
    G. Baldin1, A. Ciccullo1, S. Rusconi2, V. Borghi3, A. Giacometti4, S.T. Kiros5, M. Colafigli6, A. Lanari7,8, L. Celani9, A. De Vito10, A. Giacomelli2, C. Mussini3, G. Sterrantino5, S. Di Giambenedetto1,11
    1Istituto di Malattie Infettive, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma, Italy, 2Infectious Diseases Unit, DIBIC Luigi Sacco, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 3Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria di Modena, Clinica Malattie Infettive e Tropicali, Modena, Italy, 4Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Dept. of Biomedical Sciences and Public Health, Polytechnic University of Marche, Ancona, Italy, 5Division of Tropical and Infectious Diseases, 'Careggi' Hospital, Florence, Italy, 6Infectious Dermatology and Allergology Unit, IFO S. Gallicano Institute (IRCCS), Rome, Italy, 7Infectious Diseases Unit, AOU Senese, Siena, Italy, 8Department of Medical Biotechnologies, University of Siena, Siena, Italy, 9Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Azienda Policlinico Umberto I, Rome, Italy, 10Department of Clinical, Surgical and Experimental Sciences, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy, 11Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli IRCCS, UOC Malattie Infettive, Roma, Italy
    15.35 - 15.40 PD 16Tracing the first HIV-1 epidemics in the Milan area
    A. Lai1, A. Bergna1, G. Zehender1, A. Giacomelli1, M. Ciccozzi2, C. Balotta1, M. Galli1
    1Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences "Luigi Sacco", University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 2Unit of Clinical Pathology and Microbiology, University Campus Bio-Medico of Rome, Rome, Italy
    15.43 - 15.48 PD 17Philogenetic analysis of HIV-1 in foreign patients followed at San Martino Hospital, Genoa
    B. Bruzzone2, A. Lai4, L. Magnasco3, P. Caligiuri1, S. Varesano1, N. Nigro2, A. Di Biagio3
    1Hygiene Unit, Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, IRCCS San Martino - IST, Genoa, Italy, 2Hygiene Unit, IRCCS San Martino - IST, Genoa, Italy, 3Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genoa, IRCCS San Martino - IST, Genoa, Italy, 4Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, University of Milan, Milan Italy
    15.51 - 15.56 PD 18Factors associated with being on treatment with a DRV-based regimen among adults with HIV-1 infection in real life
    L. Galli1, A. Castagna1,2, A. Poli1, S. Bossolasco1, G. Gaiera1, M. Guffanti1, M. Maillard1, A. Andolina2, A. Lazzarin1, R. Termini3, M. Palma3, D. Mancusi3
    1Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Istituto Scientifico San Raffaele, Milano, Italy, 2Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milano, Italy, 3Janssen-Cilag SpA, Medical Affairs, Infectious Diseases; Cologno Monzese, Milano, Italy
    15.59 - 16.04 PD 19Influence of Sexually Transmitted Infections on seminal HIV levels among patients on ART: preliminary data of a case-control study
    C. Stingone1, R. Scutari2, E. Teti1, L. Piermatteo2, V. Malagnino1, M. Brugneti2, M. Compagno1, A. Bertoli2, V. Svicher2, C. Cerva1, M. Santoro2, C.F. Perno3, C. Alteri3, L. Sarmati1, M. Andreoni1, F. Ceccherini Silberstein2
    1Clinical Infectious Diseases, Department of System Medicine, Tor Vergata University, Rome, Italy, 2Department of Experimental Medicine, Tor Vergata University, Rome, Italy, 3Department of Oncology and Haemoto-oncology, University of Milan, Italy
    16.30-18.00

    Oral Communications

    Targetting 90-90-90

    Oral Communications

    Targetting 90-90-90

    Chairs: G. Mazzola, F. Mazzotta, A. Saracino

    16.30 - 16.45 Different HIV screening strategies and their possible impact on HIV epidemics
    G. Parruti
    16.45 - 16.55 OC 35The UNAIDS 90-90-90 target is achievable: a fast track City experience
    F. Maggiolo, L. Comi, R. Teocchi, E. Di Filippo, A.P. Callegaro, M. Rizzi
    ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo
    16.57 - 17.07 OC 36High HIV Prevalence following Screening of Subjects with HIV Indicator Conditions in a Hospital Setting
    C. Tincati1, D. Barbanotti1, T. Bini1, A. Tavelli1, M. Ravizza2, A.M. Marconi2, M. Cattaneo3, D.A. Chiumello4, A. Cerri5, A. Priori6, D. Ferrari7, A. d’Arminio Monforte1
    1Department of Health Sciences, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, University of Milan, Italy, 2Department of Health Sciences, Clinic of Gynecology and Obstetrics, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, University of Milan, Italy, 3Department of Health Sciences, Clinic of Internal Medicine and Hematology, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, University of Milan, Italy, 4Department of Health Sciences, Clinic of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, University of Milan, Italy, 5Department of Health Sciences, Clinic of Dermatology, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, University of Milan, Italy, 6Department of Health Sciences, Clinic of Neurology, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, University of Milan, Italy, 7Clinic of Oncology, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, San Paolo Hospital, Milan, Italy
    17.09 - 17.19 OC 37Time to Linkage to Care (LtC) in the ICONA COHORT: 2010-2018
    P. Piselli1, A. Tavelli2, C. Cimaglia1, G. Chiaradia1, L. Rancilio3, M. Oldrini4, A. Cingolani5, M.E. Quiros Roldan6, V. Rizzo7, S Rusconi8, A. Caraglia9, A. d’Arminio Monforte10, E. Girardi1 for the ICONA Foundation Study Group and for the Working Group of the project “Linkage to Care in HIV: a further piece to the analysis of continuum of care in HIV in Italy”*
    1INMI L. Spallanzani IRCCS, Rome, 2Icona Foundation, Milan, 3Caritas Ambrosiana, Milan, 4LILA, Milan, 5Cattolica University, Rome, 6University of Brescia, Brescia, 7AORN dei Colli, PO D. Cotugno, Naples, 8ASST FBF-Sacco, University of Milan, Milan, 9Minister of Health, Rome, 10ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, University of Milan, Milan
    17.21 - 17.31 OC 38Is time from HIV diagnosis to ART initiation predictive of virological outcome and of retention in care?
    A. d’Arminio Monforte1, A. Tavelli2, A. Cozzi-Lepri3, A. Castagna4, S. Passerini5, D. Francisci6, A. Saracino7, F. Maggiolo8, G. Lapadula9, E. Girardi10, C.F. Perno11, A. Antinori12 for the Icona Foundation Study Group
    1ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, University of Milan, Clinic of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Dept of Health Sciences, Milan, Italy, 2Icona Foundation, Milan, Italy, 3Institute for Global Health, University College of London, London, UK, 4Division of Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy, 5III Division of Infectious Diseases, Luigi Sacco Hospital, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco, Milan, Italy, 6Unit of Infectious Diseases, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy, 7Department of Infectious Diseases, Policlinic Hospital, University of Bari 'Aldo Moro', Bari, Italy, 8Division of Infectious Diseases, ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy, 9Clinic of Infectious Diseases, ASST Monza San Gerardo Hospital, University Milano-Bicocca, Monza, Italy, 10Clinical Epidemiology Unit, INMI “L. Spallanzani” IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 11Haematology and Oncohematology Deparment, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 12Clinical Division of HIV/AIDS, INMI “L. Spallanzani” IRCCS, Rome, Italy
    17.33 - 17.43 OC 39Continuum of care among new diagnosed vs chronically followed HIV patients. Retention in care analysis in a single center cohort
    A. Comelli1, I. Izzo2, F. Donato3, A. Celotti1, E. Focà1, C. Pezzoli2, F. Castelli1, E. Quiros-Roldan1
    1University Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, University of Brescia and ASST Spedali Civili, Brescia, Italy, 2Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, ASST Spedali Civili, Brescia, Italy, 3Unit of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy
    17.45 - 17.55 OC 40Lost to follow up: ten years challenge
    M. Poliseno, D.F. Bavaro, F. Di Gennaro, G. De Vita, A. Saracino, L. Monno, G. Angarano, S. Lo Caputo
    Infectious Diseases Department University of Bari , Bari, Italy
  • Aula 201
    10.05-11.35

    Oral Communications

    Immunological insights of HIV infection

    Oral Communications

    Immunological insights of HIV infection

    Chairs: M. Lichtner, G. Tambussi, C. Tincati

    10.05 - 10.15 OC 7Interleukin 32: a new marker of chronic immune activation in HIV patients receiving antiretroviral therapy
    M. Statzu1, L. Santinelli1, C. Pinacchio2, F. Frasca1, C.M. Mastroianni2, G. Antonelli1, G. d’Ettorre2, C. Scagnolari1
    1Department of Molecular Medicine, Laboratory of Virology affiliated to Istituto Pasteur Italia - Fondazione Cenci Bolognetti, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy
    10.17 - 10.27 OC 8Efficient anti-HPV specific T cell response after vaccination in HIV patients
    M. Nasi1, S. De Biasi2, E. Bianchini1, A. Neroni3, M. Digaetano4, D. Lo Tartaro5, M. Pinti2, L. Gibellini1, D. Pavia6, A. Bignardi7, C. Mussini1,4, A. Cossarizza3
    1Department of Surgery, Medicine, Dentistry and Morphological Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 2Department of Life Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 3Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences for Children and Adults, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 4Infectious Diseases Clinics, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Policlinico di Modena, Modena, Italy, 5Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences; University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena Italy, 6Arcigay Modena "Mattew Shepard", Modena, Italy, 7Arcigay - Associazione LGBTI Italiana, Bologna, Italy
    10.29 - 10.39 OC 9Innate immune and epigenetic modulators reactivate latent HIV-1 T cell reservoirs
    E. Palermo1, C. Acchioni2, D. Di Carlo3, A. Zevini1, M. Muscolini1, M. Ferrari1, L. Castiello1, S. Virtuoso4, A. Borsetti4, G. Antonelli3, O. Turriziani3, M. Sgarbanti2, J. Hiscott1
    1Istituto Pasteur - Fondazione Cenci Bolognetti, Rome, 2Department of Infectious, Parasitic and Immune-Mediated Diseases, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, 3Department of Molecular Medicine, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Rome, 4National HIV/AIDS Research Center, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome
    10.41 - 10.51 OC 10Phenotypical Recovery of the T-cell Pool Following Switch to Dual INSTI-based cART
    C. Tincati, D. Mondatore, A. Tavelli, L. Nekrasova, M. Sala, A. d’Arminio Monforte, G. Marchetti
    Department of Health Sciences, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, University of Milan, Italy
    10.53 - 11.03 OC 11Sex-related differences in immune activation markers during HIV-1 infection
    L. Santinelli1, C. Borrazzo2, G.P. Innocenti2, C. Pinacchio2, M. Statzu1, G. Ceccarelli2, C. Scagnolari1, G. Antonelli1,3, C.M. Mastroianni2, V. Vullo2, G. d’Ettorre2
    1Laboratory of Virology, Department of Molecular Medicine, Affiliated to Istituto Pasteur Italia - Cenci Bolognetti Foundation, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 2Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 3Microbiology and Virology Unit, Sapienza University Hospital, Rome, Italy
    11.05 - 11.15 OC 12Stable Microbial Function Despite Shifts in the Faecal Microbiota Composition According to Third-Drug Class in Antiretroviral-Naive Individuals Introducing cART
    G. Ancona1, C. Tincati1, E. Merlini1, A. Calcagno2, A. d’Arminio Monforte1, G. Marchetti1
    1Department of Health Sciences, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, University of Milan, Italy, 2Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Torino
    11.17 - 11.27 OC 13No association between patterns of 179-181tripeptide of the V2 domain binding the gut-homing α4β7 integrin and levels of bacterial translocation markers in HIV-1 infected patients naïve to antiretrovirals
    F. Balena, D.F. Bavaro, C. Fabrizio, A. Volpe, A. Lagioia, G. Angarano, L. Monno, A. Saracino
    Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, University of Bari Medical School, Bari, Italy
    11.40-13.10

    Oral Communications

    New insights in HIV pathogenesis

    Oral Communications

    New insights in HIV pathogenesis

    Chairs: D. Cattaneo, S. Parisi, G. Scarlatti

    11.40 - 11.50 OC 21Analitical treatment interruption does not alter size but might cause genetic diversification of the HIV-1 peripheral reservoir
    C. Alteri1, R. Scutari2, L. Galli3, M.C. Bellocchi2, L. Carioti2, V. Costabile4, A. Poli3, A. Galli3, F. Ceccherini Silberstein2, C.F. Perno1, M.M. Santoro2, A. Castagna3,5, V. Spagnuolo5
    1Department of Oncology and Hemato-oncology, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 2Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, 3Infectious Diseases, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy, 4Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 5Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy
    11.52 - 12.02 OC 22HIV mediated insertional mutagenesis induces a viral reservoir in T-regulatory cells
    E. Bruzzesi1,3, L. Rudilosso2, P. Gallina2, A. Calabria2, S. Nozza1, G. Tambussi1, A. Castagna1,3, E. Montini2, D. Cesana2
    1Department of Infectious Diseases, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Italy, 2San Raffaele Telethon Institute for Gene Therapy (SR-TIGET), San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Italy, 3Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan
    12.04 - 12.14 OC 23Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy and osteogenic differentiation: new hints into drug-induced osteopenia
    A. Cazzaniga, S. De Rose, V. Romeo, JAM Maier, S. Rusconi
    1General Pathology Laboratory, DIBIC Luigi Sacco, University of Milan, 2Infectious Diseases Unit, DIBIC Luigi Sacco, University of Milan
    12.16 - 12.26 OC 24Aging and hemato-lymphopoiesis in HIV infection: role of Per2 in the regulation of hematopoietic progenitor cells functions
    V. Bordoni1, E. Tartaglia1, A. Sacchi1, R. Casetti1, E. Cimini1, G. Grassi1, O. Forini1, A. Antinori2, C. Agrati1
    1Laboratorio di Immunologia Cellulare e Farmacologia, INMI-IRCCS L.Spallanzani, Roma, 2Dipartimento Clinico INMI-IRCCS L.Spallanzani, Roma
    12.28 - 12.38 OC 25DNA damage response genes: analysis of mRNA expression in naive and ART-treated HIV positive patients
    D. Di Carlo1, F. Falasca1, E. Panzini2, I. Sciandra1, T. Melengu1, O. Turriziani1, G. Antonelli1
    1Department of Molecular Medicine "Sapienza" University of Rome, Rome, 2University Hospital Policlinico Umberto I, Rome
    12.40 - 12.50 OC 26Endoplasmic reticulum associated aminopeptidases 2 (ERAP2) is released in the secretome of activated MDMs and reduces in vitro HIV-1 infection
    I. Saulle1, S.V. Ibba1, E. Torretta2, C. Vittori1, C. Fenizia3, F. Piancone4, D. Minisci5, E.M. Lori1, D. Trabattoni1, C. Gelfi2, M. Clerici3,4, M. Biasin1
    1Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences L. Sacco, University of the study Milan, Milan, Italy, 2Department of Biomedical Science for Health, University of the study Milan, Milan, Italy, 3Department of Pathophysiology Medical-Surgery and Transplantation, University of the study of Milan, Milan, Italy, 4Don C. Gnocchi Foundation ONLUS, IRCCS, Milan, Italy, 5Department of Infectious Disease, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco, Milan, Italy
    12.52 - 13.02 OC 27Interferon-inducible TRIM22 interacts with histone deacetylase (HDAC)-1 to maintain HIV-1 proviral latency
    E. Vicenzi1, F. Turrini1,2, G. Forlani3, S. Ghezzi1, R.S. Accolla3, G. Poli2,4
    1Unit of Viral Pathogens and Biosafety, Division of Immunology, Transplantation and Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy, 2Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, School of Medicine, Milan, Italy, 3Laboratories of General Pathology and Immunology “Giovanna Tosi”, Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Insubria, Varese, Italy, 4AIDS Immunopathogenesis Unit, Division of Immunology, Transplantation and Infectious Diseases, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano, Italy
    13.15-14.00

    Con la sponsorizzazione non condizionante di:

    The last mile towards HCV elimination

    Synergy within institutions, clinicians and network systems has been the basis to develop integrated strategies for the management of chronic liver disease due to HCV infection. The challenge now is to screen and diagnose all in need of treatment. It means to identity and engage the critical mass of the many unaware of their condition or the difficult-to-reach high-risk populations, ensuring a wide-scale treatment. The high efficacy and the excellent safety of the new pangenotypic therapy show evidence of a reduced need for intensive treatment monitoring and simplify screening, diagnosis and care in few visits. An effective streamline approach that can make elimination of HCV in Italy by 2030 a feasible goal.

    Chairs: G.B. Gaeta, M. Puoti

    13.15 - 13.30 Strategies for HCV control beyond network models
    A. Craxì
    13.30 - 13.45 Test and treat approach: the next step to eradication
    N. Coppola
    13.45 - 14.00 Discussion on Symposium issues
    14.05-14.50

    Con la sponsorizzazione non condizionante di:

    Long-life individuality in caring for HIV

    Nowadays challenges in caring for HIV are both the management of long-term antiretroviral therapy and the unmet needs of every single HIV-positive patient. Today antiretroviral drugs are easy to take, powerful and well tolerated. HIV-positive patients require long-life treatments and maintaining durability and tolerability of antiretroviral regimen in association with other co-administered drugs for incoming comorbidities. The aim of the symposium is to examine how current antiretroviral agents may be better incorporated into management strategies in daily practice to benefit patients now and to preserve the future. This is the most important goal: taking into account increasing age of HIV population and concomitant diseases and therapies that are now the challenge for Infectivologists.

    Chair: M. Andreoni

    14.05 - 14.20 The challenge of focusing on the right patient
    C. Mussini
    14.20 - 14.35 Tolerability: the long-life issue
    S. Lo Caputo
    14.35 - 14.50 Tailored Daily Practice
    A. Di Biagio
    14.55-16.25

    Oral Communications

    Let's PrEP now: Italian experiences

    Oral Communications

    Let's PrEP now: Italian experiences

    Chairs: M. Errico, B. Marchini, L. Sighinolfi

    14.55 - 15.05 OC 28PrEP services in Italy: how many people access them and what kind of services are offered?
    G.M. Corbelli1, L. Badia2, E. Barchi3, F. Bonvicini3, F. Caselli4, B.M. Celesia5, M. Cernuschi6, A. Cingolani7, M. Cordioli8, G. Cuomo9, I. Dal Conte10, G. De Carli11, A. Degli Antoni12, F. Di Lorenzo13, M. Errico14, F.M. Fusco15, S. Mattioli1, V. Mazzotta11, A. Muscatello16, S. Nozza17, T. Prestileo13, A. Raimondi10, R. Rossotti18, A. Ruggieri19, L. Sighinolfi20, C. Stingone21, S. Venturelli22, V. Puro11
    1Plus onlus/BLQ Checkpoint, Bologna, 2Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi - Ambulatorio PrEP Bologna, 3Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova - Spazio Sessualità salute, Reggio Emilia, 4Ospedale Infermi - UO Malattie Infettive, Rimini, 5Università di Catania ARNAS Garibaldi - UOC Malattie Infettive, Catania, 6Asa/Checkpoint Milano, 7Fondazione Policlinico "A. Gemelli", IRCCS Roma, 8AOUI Ospedale Policlinico “G.B. Rossi” - UOC Malattie Infettive e Tropicali, Verona, 9Policlinico di Modena - Malattie Infettive - ambulatorio PrEP, Modena, 10Ospedale Amedeo di Savoia - Ambulatorio IST, Torino, 11INMI L. Spallanzani - Ambulatorio PrEP, Roma, 12U.O.Malattie Infettive Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria - Ambulatorio PrEP, Parma, 13A.R.N.A.S. Ospedale Civico - Malattie Infettive, Palermo, 14Network Persone Sieropositive, Milano, 15Ospedale Santa Maria Annunziata - SOC Malattie infettive, Bagno a Ripoli, 16Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda - Osp. Maggiore Policlinico - Ambulatorio di Malattie Infettive, Milano, 17Ospedale San Raffaele - Dipartimento di Malattie Infettive, Milano, 18Ospedale Niguarda - SC Malattie Infettive, Milano, 19Ospedale “Guglielmo da Saliceto” - UOC Malattie Infettive, Piacenza, 20Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria - U.O. Malattie Infettive, Ferrara, 21Policlinico di Tor Vergata - Ambulatorio di Malattie Infettive, Roma, 22Ospedale di Bergamo – Ambulatorio PrEP
    15.07 - 15.17 OC 29Getting toward a Checkpoint: experience of a PrEP service by our association
    A. Bianchi1, A. Tavelli2, M. Lanza1, D. Delelegn1, V. Bertino2, A. De Bona2, E. Suardi2, S. Negri3, M. Bagnato3, P.L. Vinti1, A. Antonino1, G. Fracca1, M. Cernuschi1
    1ASA. Associazione Solidarietà AIDS, Milan, Italy, 2San Paolo Hospital, Milan, Italy, 3Anlaids Sezione Lombardia, Milan, Italy
    15.19 - 15.29 OC 30Pre-exposure prophylaxis: very first epidemiological data and clinical outcomes of the Modena outpatient clinic users
    A. Raimondi1, G. Cuomo1, C. Rogati1, A. Bianchi1, B. Beghetto1, E. Roncaglia1, G. Nardini1, V. Borghi1, G. Guaraldi1, M. Coppini2, C. Mussini1
    1Clinica di Malattie Infettive, Azienda Ospedaliera-Universitaria di Modena - Modena, 2Clinica Dermatologica, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia - Modena
    15.31 - 15.41 OC 31Preliminary introduction of Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) with emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil (F/TDF) in MSM population in Rome
    F. De Zottis1, V. Mazzotta1, G. De Carli1, R. Bellagamba1, A. Cingolani2, S. Nappi2, C. Stingone3, M. Farinella4, G.M. Corbelli5, M. Andreoni3, V. Puro1, A. Antinori1
    1Istituto Nazionale per le Malattie Infettive Lazzaro Spallanzani IRCCS, Roma, 2Clinica Malattie Infettive, Fondazione Policlinico A. Gemelli IRCCS, Università Cattolica S. Cuore, Roma, 3Clinica Malattie Infettive, Università di Roma Tor Vergata, Roma, 4Circolo di Cultura Omosessuale Mario Mieli, Roma, 5PLUS Onlus, Bologna
    15.43 - 15.53 OC 32Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis: overall perception and discouraging factors among a cohort of MSM - data from the SEX-CHECK study
    A. Maccaro1, L. Badia1, V. Guardigni1, P. Malosso1, R. Pascale1, S. Coladonato1, B. Tazza1, E. Rosselli Del Turco1, G.M. Corbelli2, G. Verucchi1, P. Viale1, S. Mattioli2
    1Infectious Diseases Unit, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, 2PLUS Onlus, Bologna
    15.55 - 16.05 OC 33PrEP and risky behaviour: preliminary data from the Milano Checkpoint
    M. Cernuschi, A. De Bona, D. Tesoro, E. Suardi, A. Tavelli, S. Negri, S. Bossolasco, A. Bianchi, A. Borrelli, D. Calzavara, D. Maineri, P. Vinti, L. Cosmaro, A. d’Arminio Monforte for the Milano Checkpoint association
    ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Milano, Checkpoint Milano, Milano
    16.07 - 16.17 OC 34Assessment of the trough concentrations of tenofovir in HIV-negative subjects on pre-exposure prophylaxis: a single center, real-life experience
    D. Cattaneo1, C. Gervasoni1, S. Baldelli1, P. Vinti2, M. Fusi1, D. Zagato2, A. De Bona3, E. Suardi3, S. Bossolasco4, M, Cernuschi2,4
    1ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco University Hospital, Milan, Italy, 2Associazione Solidarietà AIDS (ASA) Onlus, Milan, Italy, 3ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Milan, Italy; 4IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy
    16.30-18.00

    Oral Communications

    Cancers and bacterial infections

    Oral Communications

    Cancers and bacterial infections

    Chairs: G. Guaraldi, S. Piconi

    16.30 - 16.40 OC 41Latent Tuberculosis Prevalence at HIV Diagnosis: a Multicenter SIMIT Study
    D. Goletti1, A. Navarra1, C. Cimaglia1, E. Petruccioli1, G. Cuzzi1, A. Giannetti1, V. Mazzotta1, A. Spolti2, C. Mastroianni3, P. Pavone3, M. Galli4, F. Franzetti4, E. Pontali5, M. Lichtner6, L. Sarmati7, M. Compagno7, D. Piacentini8, V. Pirriatore9, G. Lapadula2, A. Gori10, E. Tacconelli8, E. Girardi1, A. Antinori1, A. Calcagno9
    1INMI Lazzaro Spallanzani IRCCS, Rome, 2Ospedale San Gerardo, Monza, 3Policlinico Umberto I, Università Sapienza, Rome, 4Ospedale Luigi Sacco Hospital - Polo Universitario, Milan, 5Ospedali Galliera, Genoa, 6Ospedale Santa Maria Goretti, Latina, 7Policlinico Universitario Università Tor Vergata, 8Università degli studi di Verona, Verona, 9Università degli studi di Torino, Turin, 10Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan
    16.42 - 16.52 OC 42Evaluation of the effect of HIV infection on quantiferon plus results in patients with active tubercolosis and latent infection
    E. Petruccioli1, T. Chiacchio1, V. Vanini1, G. Cuzzi1, C. Cimaglia2, A. Navarra2, N. Riccardi3,4, C. Pinnetti5, V. Mazzotta5, L.R. Codecasa4,6, E. Girardi2, A. Antinori5, D. Goletti1
    1Translational Research Unit, National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 2Epidemiology Unit, National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 3Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Policlinico San Martino Hospital, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy, 4 StopTB Italia Onlus, Milan, Italy, 5Clinical Department, National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 6Regional Tb Refrence Centre-Villa Marelli Inst/Niguarda Hosp Milano
    16.54 - 17.04 OC 43Syphilis reinfection in HIV patients: the experience of a large clinical center in Rome
    C. Picarelli1, F. Lombardi1, S. Belmonti1, A. Ciccullo1, A. Emiliozzi1, D. Farinacci1, D. Moschese1, G. Baldin1, S. Lamonica1, A. Borghetti1,2, A. Cingolani1,2, S. Di Giambenedetto1,2
    1Institute of Clinical Infectious Diseases, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy, 2Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A.Gemelli, IRCSS, Rome, Italy
    17.06 - 17.16 OC 44Predictors of Ureaplasma urealyticum urinary colonization in HIV+ pregnant women: a pilot study
    I. Franconi, C. Puzzolante, A. Bianchi, N. Riva, A. Raimondi, M. Digaetano, A. Santoro, V. Borghi, G. Guaraldi, C. Mussini
    Infectious Diseases Unit, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia
    17.18 - 17.28 OC 45CD4/CD8 ratio predicts the onset of virus-related cancers in HIV-positive patients on effective cART
    E. Suardi1, A. Cozzi Lepri2, G. Madeddu3, V. Spagnuolo4, S. Vita5, V. Manfrin6, A. Bandera7, A. Cingolani8, A. Antinori9, C. Mussini10, G. Marchetti1, A. d'Arminio Monforte1, for the Icona Foundation Study Group
    1Clinic of Infectious Diseases, San Paolo Hospital-ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, University of Milano, Milano, Italy, 2Institute for Global Health, University College of London, London, UK, 3Department of Medical, Surgical and Experimental Sciences, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy, 4Division of Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy, 5Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, University Sapienza of Rome, 6Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, St. Bortolo Hospital, Vicenza, Italy, 7Infectious Diseases Unit, Departement of Internal Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 8Institute of Clinical Infectious Diseases, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Policlonico Gemelli, Rome, Italy, 9Clinical Division of HIV/AIDS, INMI “L. Spallanzani” IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 10Infectious Diseases Clinic, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy
    17.30 - 17.40 OC 46Persistence of High Peripheral Activated CD8+ T-cells and Not a Low CD4/CD8 Ratio Predict HPV-Related Dysplasia in cART-Treated, HIV-Infected Subjects
    C. Tincati1, F. Bai1, D. Mondatore1, A. Vasile Baja1, E. Suardi1, M. Giovenzana2, A. Pisani Ceretti2, A. d’Arminio Monforte1, G. Marchetti1
    1Department of Health Sciences, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, University of Milan, Italy, 2Department of Health Sciences, Unit of Hepatobilyopancreatic and Digestive Surgery, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, University of Milan, Italy
    17.42 - 17.52 OC 47Two-drugs regimens do not increase the risk of tumour in HIV+ patients
    A. Borghetti1, S. Bellino2, F. Lombardi3, D. Moschese3, A. Ciccullo3, N. Ciccarelli4, G. Baldin3, A. Dusina3, A. Emiliozzi3, S. Lamonica3, S. Belmonti3, A. Cingolani3, P. Pezzotti2, S. Di Giambenedetto1,2
    1IRCCS Fondazione Policlinico Gemelli, Rome, Italy, 2Department of Infectious Diseases,Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome,Italy, 3Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy, 4Dipartimento di Psicologia, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Milano, Italy
  • Aula Malliani
    11.40-12.40

    Con la sponsorizzazione non condizionante di:

    The revolution of rapid molecular diagnosis near patient

    The aim of the workshop is to illustrate the advantages of rapid molecular diagnosis in the virology field. Different healthcare professionals (HCP) will provide an explanation of the technology and the impact of tests in different setting such as hospitals or alternative sites.

    Discussants: M. Cernuschi, S. Mattioli

    11.40 - 12.00 The impact of molecular technology on HIV
    A. Gori
    12.00 - 12.20 The impact of molecular technology on HCV
    C.F. Perno
    12.20 - 12.40 Discussion on Expert Meeting issues
    12.45-13.45

    Con la sponsorizzazione non condizionante di:

    Moving forward to tailored approaches: real life & future in virology

    Treatment personalization, based on patients' features, is becoming in HIV and HCV increasingly important. Efficacy, extremely high tolerability, as well as low DDI are now crucial treatment imperatives. Starting from real world clinical evidences going through innovative new treatment options, personalization is essential to ensure patients' high QoL and treatment effectiveness.

    Chair: G. Rizzardini

    12.45 - 13.00 DAA in clinical real life
    L. Kondili
    13.00 - 13.15 Real world evidences: QD INSTI based strategies
    S. Di Giambenedetto
    13.15 - 13.30 HIV- 1 infection: time to drive safely
    A. Castagna
    13.30 - 13.45 Discussion on Expert Meeting issues
    14.00-15.00

    Con la sponsorizzazione non condizionante di:

    Recent advances in the management of Gram positive infections: the evolving role of long acting therapy

    Gram positive infections are a continuing challenge for clinicians: while classic pathogens still persist and evolve acquiring new mechanisms of resistance, new pathogens emerge with intrinsic multiple antibiotics resistance profiles, causing life-threatening infections as nosocomial pneumonia and intravascular device associated bloodstream infections. Not less important, the population at risk, i.e. elderly with multiple comorbidities or recipients of various foreign bodies, is increasing. New therapy options are required, with increased bactericidal activity and antibacterial spectrum that includes multiple resistant pathogens. Finally, oral or long acting agents might be critical in order to reduce hospital costs with outpatient therapy feasible even for serious infections as bone and joint infections or endocarditis. In recent years the antimicrobial armamentarium has been enriched by very long acting anti Gram positive agents approved for the therapy of ABSSI, as oritavancin and dalbavancin. In particular, pharmacokinetic profile and convenient single dosing make dalbavancin an interesting option for other serious Gram positive infections requiring prolonged treatment courses, for example bone infections, endocarditis and intravascular line associated infections. The aim of this workshop is to critically review all available experiences with long acting agents in order to provide an up-to-date of the actual and potential future role of this options for serious Gram positive infections.

    Chair: M. Tavio

    14.00 - 15.00 Recent advances in the management of Gram positive infections: the evolving role of long acting therapy
    S. Borrè, M. Venditti
    15.15-16.15

    Con la sponsorizzazione di:

    Potency of drugs to overcome the challenges of micro-elimination

    Italy is among the European countries with the greatest number of people exposed to the hepatitis C virus. Socially speaking, it exist an important need to treat HCV infections as quick as possible particularly in special populations (i.e., hemodialysis, liver transplantation, HIV co-infection). In this context the Inhibitory Quotient plays a relevant role in view of the growing demand for anti-HCV therapies in populations with a greater risk of variable therapeutic adherence and a complex therapeutic management. This last aspect will be a pharmacological parameter presented during the expert meeting, contextualized in the area of HCV therapy to highlight the potency of new DAAs and its possible role in the short therapeutic choice.

    Chair: G. Rizzardini

    15.15 - 15.25 Introduction
    15.25 - 15.45 Inhibitory Quotient of DAAs in HCV: pharmacokinetics and clinical relevance
    V. Zuccaro
    15.45 - 16.05 The importance of Short Therapy for the treatment of special populations with HCV
    G. Taliani
    16.05 - 16.15 Discussion on Expert Meeting issues
    16.30-17.30

    Con la sponsorizzazione non condizionante di:

    Hospital acquired and Gram negative-resistant pneumonia

    The objective of the meeting is to have a clear picture of the nosocomial pneumonia related burden and patient outcome and provide clinicians with updates on the management of MDR Gram negative infections in the hospital setting.

    Chair: G. Di Perri

    16.30 - 17.30 Hospital acquired and Gram negative-resistant pneumonia
    M. Bassetti
 
Aula Magna
Aula 211
Aula 201
Aula Malliani
09.00 - 10.00

Aula Magna

Keynote Lectures
10.05 - 10.30
10.30 - 11.30
11.40 - 12.25
12.30 - 13.10
13.15 - 14.00
14.05 - 15.35

Symposium

Getting to zero in HIV and HCV

Fernando Aiuti Symposium

New immune tools and targets towards an HIV cure

Oral Communications

New challenges of viral hepatitis

Oral Communications

ART and long-term safety issues

Oral Communications

From naive to highly treated subjects. Efficacy of cART

Oral Communications

Social and PLWHIV related issues

Oral Communications

Resistance. Is it still a problem?

Oral Communications

Changing HIV epidemiology

Poster Discussion

HIV co-morbidities

Poster Discussion

Virology, Immunology and Basic science
 

Poster Discussion

Viral Hepatitis

Poster Discussion

HIV therapy and management
15.40 - 16.45

Aula Magna

Round Table "U=U"
16.45 - 17.00

Aula Magna

ICAR 2019 Special Awards
17.00 - 17.15

Aula Magna

ICAR 2019 Closing remarks
  • Aula Magna
    09.00-10.00 Keynote Lectures

    Keynote Lectures

    Chairs: M. Cernuschi, M.U. Mondelli, M. Puoti

    09.00 - 09.30 Community-based interventions on chemsex among MSM
    J. Garrido
    09.30 - 10.00 New perspectives for medical treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma
    A. Craxì
    10.05-11.35

    Symposium

    Getting to zero in HIV and HCV

    Symposium

    Getting to zero in HIV and HCV

    Achievement of the ambitious HIV and HCV elimination targets is put at risk by the challenges encountered in reaching out to key populations. This session aims to highlight best practices and suggests how to overcome existing barriers and move forward to get to Zero.

    Chairs: M.L. Cosmaro, P. Pezzotti, C. Torti

    10.05 - 10.20 Ending HIV in England by 2030 - issues and actions
    N. Gill
    10.20 - 10.35 Getting to zero in Italian MSM
    G.M. Corbelli, M. Farinella
    10.35 - 10.50 Gender identity and sexual health issues
    M. Formisano
    10.50 - 11.05 Getting to zero in people using drugs
    A. Guidotti
    11.05 - 11.20 Fast Track in every city
    B. Audoin
    11.20 - 11.35 Discussion on Symposium issues
    11.40-12.25

    Con la sponsorizzazione di:

    The beauty of what is possible

    Evolution of antiretroviral therapy transformed the HIV from a fatal disease to a manageable chronic condition, moving forward the unmet medical needs. The meaning in the real word practice is that efficacy, tolerability and simplicity should be evaluated in a longer timeframe, as life lasting treatment. Since the therapy will be for a longer life, also QoL plays a relevant role so the Italian guidelines states that HRQoL should be measured at baseline and at each clinical evaluation becoming one of the primary goal of ART. How can this evaluation can be done in clinical practice? It's time to rethink the point of view by adding pts' lifestyle consideration on top of the clinical aspects.

    Chair: A. d'Arminio Monforte

    11.40 - 11.55 Evolving triple therapy - filling the unmet need
    S. Lo Caputo
    11.55 - 12.10 Patient Reported Outcomes (PROs) in the clinical practice - changing the point of view
    A. Cingolani
    12.10 - 12.25 Discussion on Symposium issues
    12.30-14.00

    Fernando Aiuti Symposium

    New immune tools and targets towards an HIV cure

    Fernando Aiuti Symposium

    New immune tools and targets towards an HIV cure

    As we are conveying our scientific efforts towards the achievement of a cure for HIV infection, different strategies are nowadays being investigated. During this symposium, the major pathways exploitable within strategies of functional cure will be reviewed, that include the role of different immune cells involved in both viral persistence and protective immunity in both peripheral blood and tissues, the detailed insight of protective immune responses may that be delivered via vaccination or monoclonal therapeutics, as well as the fine characterization of the immunologic consequences of HIV infection within the gut. the symposium will also review the latest findings in terms of vaccination strategies.

    Chairs: M. Clementi, C.M. Mastroianni, G. Silvestri

    12.30 - 12.45 Gut damage and dysfunction: any insight towards an HIV cure?
    G.C. Marchetti
    12.45 - 13.00 Broadly neutralizing antibodies in the prevention and treatment of HIV infection
    F. Klein
    13.00 - 13.15 HIV vaccines: how far are we from a cure?
    B. Mothe
    13.15 - 13.30 New cells in HIV persistence and immune control
    C. Agrati
    13.30 - 14.00 Discussion on Symposium issues
    14.05-15.35

    Oral Communications

    New challenges of viral hepatitis

    Oral Communications

    New challenges of viral hepatitis

    Chairs: V. Cento, M.A. Di Pietro, V. Svicher

    14.05 - 14.15 OC 72The use of accurate virological and immunological hepatitis B markers can allow an early diagnosis of HBV reactivation in HBsAg-negative/anti-HBc-positive patients with oncohematological diseases
    R. Salpini1, C. Cerva2, M. Alkhatib1, A. Battisti1, L. Piermatteo1, A. Sacco1, V. Malagnino2, W. Arcese3, M. Cantonetti3, F. Ceccherini-Silberstein1, C. F. Perno4, M. Andreoni2, L. Sarmati2, V. Svicher1
    1Department of Experimental Medicine, Tor Vergata University, Rome, Italy, 2Clinical Infectious Disease, Department of System Medicine, Tor Vergata University, Rome, Italy, 3Department of Hematology, Stem Cell Transplant Unit, Tor Vergata University, Rome, Italy, 4Department of Oncology and Haematooncology, University of Milan
    14.17 - 14.27 OC 73The integration of Hepatitis B virus in relevant regions of human genome occurs frequently in HBeAg negative chronic infection despite limited liver disease and low-viraemia: implications for an altered cell metabolism
    R. Salpini1, L. Carioti1, A. Battisti1,2, L. Colagrossi1,3, L. Piermatteo1, M. Surdo4, V. Cacciafesta4, A. Nuccitelli4, N. Hansi2, F. Ceccherini-Silberstein1, C.F. Perno5, U.S. Gill2, P.T.F. Kennedy2, V. Svicher1
    1"Tor Vergata" University of Rome, Department of Experimental Medicine and Surgery, Rome, Italy, 2Barts Liver Centre, Blizard Institute, Barts and The London SMD, QMUL, London, United Kingdom, 3Department of Microbiology and Virology, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 4GENOMA, Molecular Genetics Laboratory, Rome, Italy, 5Department of Oncology and Haematooncology, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
    14.29 - 14.39 OC 74Decline of Prevalence of Resistance Associated Substitutions to NS3 and NS5A inhibitors at DAA-failure in Hepatitis C Virus in Italy over the years 2015 to 2018
    D. Redi1,2, B. Rossetti1, V.C. Di Maio3, M. Aragri3, S. Paolucci4, C. Masetti5, L. Paglicci1,2, B. Bruzzone6, C. Minichini7, F. Montagnani1,2, V. Micheli8, S. Landonio9, E. Degasperi10, G. Zanelli1,2, R. Maserati11, I. Maida12, A.P. Callegaro13, S. Barbaliscia3, A. Bertoli3, C. Paternoster14, S. Marenco15, F. Morisco16, V. Calvaruso17, G. Taliani18, M. Puoti19, G. Cenderello20, A. De Santis21, M. Lichtner22, N. Coppola7, R. Gulminetti11, V. Cento23, M. Rendina24, E. Teti25, G. Parruti26, T. Ruggiero27, V. Ghisetti27, C. Pasquazzi28, L.A. Nicolini29, V. Vullo30, A. Pellicelli31, T. Prestileo32, R. Cozzolongo33, V. Sangiovanni34 , M. Biolato35, I. Lenci5, A. Licata36, A Ciaccio37, V. Pace Palitti38, A. Giorgini39, G. Cariti40, A. Ciancio41, A. Aghemo42, V. Borghi43, P. Andreone44, M. Brunetto45, T. Pollicino46, T. Santantonio47, N. Cuomo48, C. Caudai49, S. Babudieri12, P. Lampertico10, G.B. Gaeta7, G. Raimondo46, M. Andreoni25, G. Rizzardini9, M. Angelico5, C.F. Perno50, A. Craxì17, M. Zazzi2, F. Ceccherini-Silberstein3 on behalf of HCV Virology Italian Resistance Network (Vironet C)
    1Infectious Diseases Unit, AOU Senese, Siena, Italy, 2Department of Medical Biotechnology, University of Siena, Siena, Italy, 3Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 4Molecular Virology Unit, Microbiology and Virology department, IRCCS Policlinic Foundation San Matteo, Pavia, Italy, 5Hepatology Unit, University Hospital of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 6Hygiene Unit, IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, Genoa, Italy, 7Infectious Diseases Unit, University of Campania L. Vanvitelli, Naples, Italy, 8Clinical Microbiology, Virology and Bioemergencies Diagnosis, L. Sacco University Hospital, Milan, Italy, 9Division of Infectious Diseases, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco, Milan, Italy, 10CRC “A.M. e A. Migliavacca" Center for Liver Diseases, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 11Institute of Infectious Diseases, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy, 12Medical, Surgical and Experimental Sciences, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy, 13Department of Laboratory Medicine, ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy, 14Infectious Disease Unit, Ospedale di Trento, Trento, Italy, 15Division of Hepatology, University of Genoa-AOU IRCCS San Martino-IST, Genoa, Italy, 16Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, University "Federico II" of Naples, Naples, Italy, 17Gastroenterology, “P. Giaccone” University Hospital, Palermo, Italy, 18Department of Clinical Medicine, Clinic of Tropical Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 19Division of Infectious Diseases, ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milan, Italy, 20Infectious Diseases Unit, Ente Ospedaliero Galliera Hospital, Genoa, Italy, 21Gastroenterology Unit, “La Sapienza” University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 22Infectious Diseases Unit, Sapienza University, Polo Pontino, Latina, Italy, 23Residency program in Microbiology and Virology, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy, 24Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation, Section of Gastroenterology, University Hospital, Bari, Italy, 25Infectious Diseases, University Hospital of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 26Infectious Disease Unit, Pescara General Hospital, Pescara, Italy, 27Laboratory of Microbiology and Virology, Amedeo di Savoia Hospital, ASL Città di Torino, Turin, Italy, 28Infectious Diseases, Sant’Andrea Hospital – “La Sapienza”, Rome, Italy, 29Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), University of Genoa, 30Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University, Rome, 31Hepatology Unit, San Camillo Forlanini Hospital, Rome, Italy, 32Infectious Diseases Unit, ARNAS Civico-Di Cristina-Benefratelli, Palermo, Italy, 33Division of Gastroenterology, National Institute of Gastroenterology S De Bellis, Castellana Grotte (Bari), Italy, 34Hospital Cotugno, Naples, Italy, 35Liver Transplant Medicine, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma, Italy, 36Internal Medicine and Hepatology, Di.Bi.M.I.S, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy, 37Unit of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Hospital San Gerardo, Monza, Italy, 38Hepatology Unit, Pescara General Hospital, Pescara, Italy, 39ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Milan, Italy, 40Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Amedeo di Savoia Hospital, Turin, Italy, 41Unit of Gastroenterology, University of Turin, Department of Medical Sciences, City of Health and Science of Molinette Turin Hospital, Turin, Italy, 42Department of Biomedical Sciences, Humanitas University, Pieve Emanuele (MI), Italy, 43Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Modena School of Medicine, Modena, Italy, 44Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Maternal-Infantile and Adult Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 45Hepatology Unit, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy, 46Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Messina, Messina, Italy, 47Infectious Diseases Unit, University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy, 48Microbiology and Virology, Azienda Ospedaliera Specialistica dei Colli Monaldi - Cotugno - C.T.O., Naples, Italy, 49Microbiology and Virology Unit, Siena University Hospital, 50Department of Oncology and Oncohematology, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
    14.41 - 14.51 OC 75Evaluation of selective pressure on target regions of anti-HCV direct antivirals in liver and plasma compartments: application of Mixed Effects Model of Evolution (MEME) algorithm
    S. Bagaglio1, E. Messina1, H. Hasson1, C. Uberti-Foppa2, G. Morsica1
    1Division of Infectious Diseases, Ospedale San , Italy, 2Vita-Salute University, Milan, Italy
    14.53 - 15.03 OC 76Specific NS5A polymorphisms correlate with hepatocellular carcinoma in cirrhotic patients infected with HCV genotype 1b
    M. Alkhatib1, V.C. Di Maio1, V. De Murtas2, M. Aragri1, R. Scutari1, A. Sacco1, E. Polilli3, C. Masetti4, E. Teti5, S. Barbaliscia1, A. Bertoli1, V. Cento6, V. Calvaruso7, F. Morisco8, V. Pace Palitti9, C. Pasquazzi10, P. Cacciatore3, S. Francioso4, F. Sozio3, A. Pieri3, S. Babudieri2, C. Mussini11, G. Parruti3, V. Borghi11, I. Lenci4, A. Craxì6, M. Andreoni5, M. Angelico4, I. Maida2, A. Orro12, L. Milanesi12, M.M. Santoro1, C.F. Perno6, V. Svicher1, F. Ceccherini-Silberstein1, R. Salpini1
    1Department of Experimental Medicine and Surgery, University of Rome "Tor Vergata", Rome, Italy, 2Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy, 3Infectious Diseases Unit, Pescara General Hospital, Pescara, Italy, 4Hepatology Unit, University Hospital of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome, Italy, 5Infectious Diseases Unit, University Hospital of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome, Italy, 6University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 7Gastroenterology, “P. Giaccone” University Hospital, Palermo, Italy, 8Gastroenterology, «Federico II» University, Naples, Italy, 9Hepatology Unit, Pescara General Hospital, Pescara, Italy, 10Infectious Diseases Unit, Sant’Andrea Hospital – “Sapienza” University, Rome, Italy, 11Polyclinic of Modena, Modena, Italy, 12Institute of Biomedical Technologies, National Research Council, Segrate, Milan, Italy
    15.05 - 15.15 OC 77Occurrence of HIV virological failure in HIV-1 positive patients during direct acting antivirals (DAAs) treatment for hepatitis C virus
    G. Morsica1, E. Messina1, A. Castagna1,2, S. Bagaglio1, S. Salpietro1, L. Della Torre1, C. Uberti-Foppa1,2, H. Hasson1
    1Division of Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy, 2Vita-Salute University, Milan, Italy
    15.17 - 15.27 OC 78High efficacy of resistance-guided retreatment in HCV infected patients who previously failed a NS5A inhibitor-containing regimen: the Italian Vironet C real life experience
    V.C. Di Maio1, M. Aragri1, C. Masetti2, S. Paolucci3, B. Bruzzone4, E. Degasperi5, S. Barbaliscia1, T. Pollicino6, C. Minichini7, V. Calvaruso8, M. Rendina9, V. Cento10, E. Teti11, V. Micheli12, V. Ghisetti13, E. Polilli14, V. Pace Palitti15, S. Landonio16, I. Lenci2, S. Francioso2, L. Donnarumma17, L.A. Nicolini18, A. Bertoli1, M. Starace7, C. Pasquazzi19, A.P. Callegaro20, F. Morisco17, G. Cenderello21, S. Marenco22, R. Gulminetti23, S. Novati23, A. Scuteri24, P. Andreone25, S. Galli26, A. Ciancio27, V. Sangiovanni28, N. Cuomo29, A. Raddi29, G. Morsica30, H. Hamid30, V. Borghi31, I. Maida32, M. Brunetto33, P. Colombatto33, R. Cozzolongo34, A. De Santis35, M. Lichtner36, S. Babudieri32, E. Biliotti37, G. Taliani37, T. Santantonio38, M. Di Stefano38, C. Paternoster39, R. Ganga40, M. Puoti41, G. Rizzardini16, A. Pellicelli42, E. Milano43, C. Mastroianni44, A. Licata45, F. Di Lorenzo46, A. Giorgini47, L. Sighinolfi48, C. Dentone49, A. Lleo50, B. Rossetti51, I. Beretta52, P. Lampertico5, G. Parruti14, N. Coppola7, M. Zazzi53, G. Raimondo6, M. Andreoni11, A. Craxì8, M. Angelico2, C.F. Perno54, F. Ceccherini-Silberstein1 on behalf of HCV Virology Italian Resistance Network (Vironet C)
    1Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 2Hepatology Unit, University Hospital of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 3Molecular Virology Unit, Microbiology and Virology department, IRCCS Policlinic Foundation San Matteo, Pavia, Italy, 4Hygiene Unit, IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, Genoa, Italy, 5CRC “A.M. e A. Migliavacca" Center for Liver Diseases, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 6Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Messina, Messina, Italy, 7Infectious Diseases Unit, University of Campania L. Vanvitelli, Naples, Italy, 8Gastroenterology, “P. Giaccone” University Hospital, Palermo, Italy, 9Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation, Section of Gastroenterology, University Hospital, Bari, Italy, 10Residency program in Microbiology and Virology, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy, 11Infectious Diseases, University Hospital of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 12Clinical Microbiology, Virology and Bioemergencies Diagnosis, L. Sacco University Hospital, Milan, Italy, 13Laboratory of Microbiology and Virology, Amedeo di Savoia Hospital, ASL Città di Torino, Turin, Italy, 14Infectious Disease Unit, Pescara General Hospital, Pescara, Italy, 15Hepatology Unit, Pescara General Hospital, Pescara, Italy, 16Division of Infectious Diseases, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco, Milan, Italy, 17Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, University "Federico II" of Naples, Naples, Italy, 18Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), University of Genoa,19Infectious Diseases, Sant’Andrea Hospital – “La Sapienza”, Rome, Italy, 20Department of Laboratory Medicine, ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy, 21Infectious Diseases Unit, Ente Ospedaliero Galliera Hospital, Genoa, Italy, 22Division of Hepatology, University of Genoa-AOU IRCCS San Martino-IST, Genoa, Italy, 23Institute of Infectious Diseases, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy, 24Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, DIMEC; Alma Mater Studiorum - University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy, 25Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Maternal-Infantile and Adult Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 26Microbiology Unit, Ospedale S.Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna, Italy, 27Unit of Gastroenterology, University of Turin, Department of Medical Sciences, City of Health and Science of Molinette Turin Hospital, Turin, Italy, 28Hospital Cotugno, Naples, Italy, 29Microbiology and Virology, Azienda Ospedaliera Specialistica dei Colli Monaldi - Cotugno - C.T.O., Naples, Italy, 30Division of Infectious Diseases, IRCCS, Ospedale San Raffaele, Milan, Italy; 31Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Modena School of Medicine, Modena, Italy, 32Medical, Surgical and Experimental Sciences, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy, 33Hepatology Unit, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy, 34Division of Gastroenterology, National Institute of Gastroenterology S De Bellis, Castellana Grotte (Bari), Italy, 35Gastroenterology Unit, “La Sapienza” University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 36Infectious Diseases Unit, Sapienza University, Polo Pontino, Latina, Italy, 37Department of Clinical Medicine, Clinic of Tropical Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 38Infectious Diseases Unit, University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy, 39Infectious Disease Unit, Ospedale di Trento, Trento, Italy, 40Azienda Ospedaliera G. Brotzu-Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy, 41Division of Infectious Diseases, ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milan, Italy, 42Hepatology Unit, San Camillo Forlanini Hospital, Rome, Italy, 43Clinic of Infectious Diseases, University of Bari, Bari, Italy, 44Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Policlinico Umberto I, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 45Internal Medicine and Hepatology, Di.Bi.M.I.S, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy, 46Infectious Diseases Unit, ARNAS Civico-Di Cristina-Benefratelli, Palermo, Italy, 47ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Milan, Italy, 48Unit of Infectious Diseases, University Hospital of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy, 49Infectious Diseases Department, Sanremo Hospital, Sanremo, Italy, 50Department of Biomedical Sciences, Humanitas University, Pieve Emanuele (MI), Italy, 51Infectious Diseases Unit, AOU Senese, Siena, Italy, 52Infectious Disease Unit, ASST Monza-San Gerardo Hospital, Monza, Italy, 53Department of Medical Biotechnology, University of Siena, Siena, Italy, 54Department of Oncology and Oncohematology, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
    15.40-16.45 Round Table U=U

    Round Table

    U=U

    The message U=U is a dramatic change in the history of HIV/AIDS epidemics. This message is the final demonstration that treatment as prevention (TASP) works. It is not a case that recently CDC, HHI and several other National Agencies have launched a program to stop HIV epidemics in 10 years in USA just concentrating on these two variables. If the message has an intrinsic objective value in terms of public health, its subjective meaning for PLWHIV is even greater. It means that stigma (or a large part of it) has no more reason to exist and it means that PLWHIV have the right and possibility to regain a normal life of relationships overcoming self-induced stigma. All these aspects will be discussed in the round-table that will approach the message in a holistic way.

    Chair: M. Tavio

    Moderatore: G. D'Amico

    Partecipanti: A. Antinori, G.M. Corbelli, F. Dal Molin, F. Maggiolo, P. Mazzoli, C. Mussini, A. Nava, M. Oldrini, B. Richman, M. Stagnitta
    16.45-17.00 ICAR 2019 Special Awards

    ICAR 2019 Special Awards

    Chairs: A. Castagna, A. d'Arminio Monforte, M. Puoti, G. Rizzardini

      ICAR 2019 Scientific Committee Awards
    A. d'Arminio Monforte
      SIMIT Awards to Best Oral Communications for Young Researchers
    M. Galli
    17.00 - 17.15 ICAR 2019 Closing Remarks

    Closing Remarks

    Chairs: A. Castagna, A. d'Arminio Monforte, M. Puoti, G. Rizzardini

  • Aula 211
    10.05-11.35

    Oral Communications

    ART and long-term safety issues

    Oral Communications

    ART and long-term safety issues

    Chairs: A.F. Capetti, A. Matteelli, M.C. Moioli

    10.05 - 10.20 Lifestyle changes (stop smoking)
    G.V.L. De Socio
    10.20 - 10.30 OC 48Overall tolerability of Integrase Inhibitors in clinical practice: results from a multicenter Italian cohort
    A. Ciccullo1, G. Baldin1, V. Borghi2, G. Sterrantino3, A. Latini4, G. d’Ettorre5, A. Lanari6,7, M. Mazzitelli8, A. De Vito9, M. Colafigli4, A. Capetti10, L. Oreni11, F. Lagi3, S. Rusconi11, S. Di Giambenedetto1,12
    1Istituto di Malattie Infettive, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma, Italy, 2Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria di Modena, Clinica Malattie Infettive e Tropicali, Modena, Italy, 3Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale e Clinica, Università di Firenze, Firenze, Italy, 4Infectious Dermatology and Allergology Unit, IFO S. Gallicano Institute (IRCCS), Rome, Italy, 5Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Azienda Policlinico Umberto I, Rome, Italy, 6Infectious Diseases Unit, AOU Senese, Siena, Italy, 7Department of Medical Biotechnologies, University of Siena, Siena, Italy, 8Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Unit of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Magna Graecia University, Catanzaro, Italy, 9Department of Clinical, Surgical and Experimental Sciences, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy, 10Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Infectious Diseases, Luigi Sacco University Hospital, Milan, Italy, 11Infectious Diseases Unit, DIBIC Luigi Sacco, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 12Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli IRCCS, UOC Malattie Infettive, Roma, Italy
    10.32 - 10.42 OC 49Dolutegravir safety in a real-life setting: results from the SCOLTA cohort
    G. Madeddu1, M.S. Mameli1, N. Squillace2, B. Menzaghi3, R. Gulminetti4, G.V. De Socio5, A. Di Biagio6, G.C. Orofino7, G. Pellicanò8, B.M. Celesia9, L. Calza10, C. Martinelli11, S. Rusconi12, A. Cascio13, F. Vichi14, G. Cenderello15, L. Valsecchi16, P. Maggi17, G. Angioni18, C. Dentone19, K. Falasca20, E. Ricci21, P. Bonfanti22, on Behalf of CISAI study group
    1Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical, Surgical and Experimental Sciences, University of Sassari, Sassari, 2Infectious Diseases Unit, Milano-Bicocca University, San Gerardo Hospital, Monza, 3Infectious Diseases Unit, ASST della Valle Olona, Busto Arsizio, 4Department of Medical Sciences and Infectious Diseases, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo -University of Pavia, 5Infectious Diseases Unit, Santa Maria Hospital, Perugia, 6Infectious Diseases Clinic, Policlinico Hospital San Martino, Genova, 7Division I of infectious and Tropical Diseases, ASL Città di Torino, 8Department of Human Pathology of the Adult and the Developmental Age “G. Barresi”, Unit of Infectious Diseases, University of Messina, 9Unit of Infectious Diseases University of Catania  ARNAS Garibaldi Catania, 10Infectious Diseases Unit, S. Orsola Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, 11SOD Malattie Infettive e Tropicali AOU Careggi, Florence, 12Infectious Diseases Unit, DIBIC "Luigi Sacco", University of Milan, 13Infectious Diseases Unit, Policlinico P. Giaccone Hospital, Palermo, 14Infectious Diseases Unit, Santa Maria Annunziata Hospital, Usl centro, Florence, 15Infectious Diseases Unit, Galliera Hospital, Genova, 16Infectious Diseases Unit, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco, Milano, 17Infectious Diseases Clinic University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Neaples, Italy, 18Infectious Diseases Unit, SS Trinità Hospital, Cagliari, 19Infectious Diseases Unit, Sanremo Hospital, Sanremo, 20Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine and Science of  Aging, University “G. d’Annunzio” Chieti-Pescara, 21Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milano, 22Infectious Diseases Unit, Ospedale A. Manzoni, Lecco
    10.44 - 10.54 OC 50Screening for inducible myocardial ischemia in asymptomatic HIV subjects: final results from CORDIS study
    V. Spagnuolo1,2, L. Galli2, A. Poli2, C. Godino3, N. Gianottii2, S. Nozza2, C. Muccini1, E. Bruzzesi1, A. Lazzarin2, A. Margonato1,3, A. Castagna1,2
    1Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, 2Infectious Diseases Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, 3Division of Clinical Cardiology, Cardiothoracovascular Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan
    10.56 - 11.06 OC 51Lipid profile changings after switching from rilpivirine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine to rilpivirine/tenofovir alafenamide/emtricitabine: different effects in different patients populations. Results from a large observational study
    L. Taramasso1,2, A. Di Biagio3, N. Riccardi2,4, F. Briano2, E. Di Filippo5, L. Comi5, S. Mora6, M. Giacomini6, A. Gori7, F. Maggiolo5
    1Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy, 2Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), University of Genoa, Genova, Italy, 3Infectious Diseases Clinic, Policlinico San Martino Hospital, Genoa, Italy, 4Infectious Diseases Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy, 5Infectious Disease Unit, ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy, 6Department of Informatics Bioengineering, Robotics, and Systems Engineering (DIBRIS), University of Genova, Genoa, Italy, 7Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
    11.08 - 11.18 OC 52Advanced machine learning systems in HIV-1 infected patients: a promising tool to predict renal impairment
    E. Grossi1, L. Galli2, A. Poli2, S. Salpietro2, L. Fumagalli2, A. Castagna2,3, A. Lazzarin2
    1Centro Ricerche Semeion, Roma, Italy, 2Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Istituto Scientifico San Raffaele, Milano, Italy, 3Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milano, Italy
    11.20 - 11.30 OC 53Uncovering EGFR profiles in HIV-infected patients: an alternative statistical approach
    C. Brombin1, C. Di Serio1, L. Galli2, A. Poli2, L. Fumagalli2, A. Castagna1,2
    1Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy, 2Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy
    11.40-13.10

    Oral Communications

    From naive to highly treated subjects. Efficacy of cART

    Oral Communications

    From naive to highly treated subjects. Efficacy of cART

    Chairs: L. Butini, M.S. Clerici, L. Sarmati

    11.40 - 11.50 OC 61Lower response to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and persistently poor survival for AIDS presentation in people seen for care in Italy from 2009 to 2018
    A. Mondi1, P. Lorenzini1, A. Cozzi-Lepri2, A. Cingolani3, M. Farenga4, S. Rusconi5, G. Di Girolamo6, A. Gori7, M. Camici1, C. Mussini8, A. D’ Arminio Monforte9, A. Antinori1 on behalf of the Icona Foundation Study Cohort
    1HIV/AIDS Department, National Institute for Infectious Diseases "Lazzaro Spallanzani" IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 2Centre for Clinical Research, Epidemiology, Modelling and Evaluation (CREME), Institute for Global Health, UCL, London, UK, 3Infectious Diseases Unit, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy, 4Infectious Diseases Unit A, Amedeo di Savoia Hospital, Torino, Italy, 5Infectious Diseases Unit, ASST FBF-Sacco, DIBIC "L. Sacco", University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 6Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Rome, Roma, Italy, 7Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, School of Medicine and Surgery, University of Milan, Milan, Italy; Infectious Diseases Unit, Departement of Internal Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy, 8Infectious Diseases Clinic, AOU Policlinico of ModenaUniversity of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 9Clinic of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Department of Health Sciences, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
    11.52 - 12.02 OC 62Virological outcomes of first line regimens in women living with HIV from Icona cohort: comparison with clinical trials data
    C. Mussini1, P. Lorenzini2, A. Cingolani3, M. Lichtner4, S. Di Giambenedetto3, A.M. Cattelan5, E. Balletto6, L. Sighinolfi7, C. Abeli8, M. Malena9, G. d’Ettorre4, A. d’Arminio Monforte10
    1University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 2INMI L. Spallanzani, Rome, 3S. Cuore Catholic University, Rome, 4 La Sapienza University, Rome, 5Padova Hospital, 6Clinic of Infectious diseases, University of Genoa, 7Sant'Anna Hospital, Ferrara, 8Busto Arsizio Hospital, 9US Malattie Infettive, Azienda Scaligera, Verona, 10University of Milan
    12.04 - 12.14 OC 63Determinants of switching to TAF-based cART or dual combinations (DT) from TDF-based regimens in a cohort of HIV-infected individuals with controlled viral load≤50 copies/mL
    A. Vergori1, R. Gagliardini1, N. Gianotti2, A. Gori3, M. Lichtner4, A. Saracino5, A. De Vito6, A. Cascio7, A. Di Biagio8, A. d’Arminio Monforte9, A. Antinori1, A. Cozzi-Lepri10
    1HIV/AIDS Unit, National Institute for Infectious Diseases, L. Spallanzani, IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 2Infectious Diseases Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, IRCCS, Milan, Italy, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy; University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 4Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Rome, Polo Pontino, Latina, Italy, 5Clinic of Infectious Diseases, University of Bari, Bari, Italy, 6Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy, 7Department of Infectious Diseases, AOU Policlinico “P.Giaccone”, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy, 8Infectious Diseases Clinic, Policlinico Hospital San Martino, Genova, Italy, 9Clinic of Infectious and Tropical Diseases , ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 10Centre for Clinical Research, Epidemiology, Modelling and Evaluation (CREME), Institute for Global Health, UCL, London, UK
    12.16 - 12.26 OC 64Residual viremia in HIV-infected patients who continue a 2-drug regimen with dolutegravir plus one reverse transcriptase inhibitor or switch to elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide: a randomized study (Be-One Study)
    N. Gianotti1, L. Galli1, A. Poli1, L. Della Torre1, C. Vinci1, E. Carini1, A. Galli1, S. Nozza1, V. Spagnuolo1,2, C. Muccini1,2, A. Lazzarin1, A. Castagna1,2
    1IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milano, 2Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele, Milano
    12.28 - 12.38 OC 65Viral potency and durability of emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide (F/TAF) based regimens in the real life setting
    A. Antinori1, A. Cozzi-Lepri2, D. Moschese3, S. Nozza4, L. Comi5, M. Santoro6, L. Sarmati7, C. Pinnetti1, F. Ceccherini Silberstein6, G. Marchetti8, F. Maggiolo5, A. d’Arminio Monforte8 for the Icona Foundation Study Group
    1Clinical Division of HIV/AIDS, INMI “L. Spallanzani” IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 2Institute for Global Health, University College of London, London, UK, 3Institute of Clinical Infectious Diseases, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Policlinico Gemelli, Rome, Italy, 4Division of Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy, 5Division of Infectious Diseases, ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy, 6Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 7Clinical Infectious Diseases, Fondazione Policlinico Tor Vergata, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 8ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, University of Milan, Clinic of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Dept of Health Sciences, Milan, Italy
    12.40 - 12.50 OC 66Burden of disease in PLWH harbouring a 4-class drug resistant virus: data from PRESTIGIO Registry
    M.R. Parisi1, A. Poli1, M. Menozzi3, M. Fiscon4, E. Garlassi5, D. Francisci6, A. Di Biagio7, G. Sterrantino8, C. Fornabaio9, A. Degli Antoni10, G. Angarano11, F.M. Fusco12, A. D’Arminio Monforte13, G.M. Corbelli14, M.M. Santoro15, M. Zazzi16, A. Castagna1,2 on behalf of the PRESTIGIO Study Group
    1Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Istituto Scientifico San Raffaele, Milano, 2Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milano, 3Malattie Infettive, Policlinico di Modena, Modena, 4UOS Malattie Infettive dell'Azienda Scaligera di Verona, Verona, 5Malattie Infettive Arcispedale S.Maria Nuova-IRCSS, Reggio Emilia, 6Clinica Malattie Infettive, Santa Maria della Misericordia, Perugia, 7Clinica Malattie Infettive, Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genova, 8Dipartimento di Medicina clinica e Sperimentale, Università degli studi di Firenze, Firenze, 9ASST Cremona, Cremona, 10Malattie Infettive ed Epatologia, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Parma, Parma, 11Università degli Studi di Bari “Aldo Moro”, Malattie Infettive, Policlinico, Bari, 12Ospedale Santa Maria Annunziata, Bagno a Ripoli, Firenze, 13Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Dept of Health Sciences, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Milano, 14Plus Onlus, Bologna, 15Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Rome "Tor Vergata", Rome, 16University of Siena, Siena, Italy
    12.52 - 13.02 OC 67Variables related to becoming Heavily Treated Experienced (HTE) patients in a large Italian cohort
    S. Lo Caputo1, A. Antinori2, A. Tavelli3, F. Ceccherini-Silberstein4, C.F. Perno5, A. Castagna6, N. Bobbio7, G. Parruti8, R. Gagliardini2, S. Bonora9, A. d’Arminio Monforte10, A. Cozzi Lepri11 for the ICONA Foundation Study Group
    1Clinic of Infectious Diseases, A.O.U.Policlinico, University of Bari, Bari, Italy, 2National Institute for Infectious Diseases ‘L. Spallanzani’ IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 3Icona Foundation Milan, Italy, 4Department of Experimental Medicine and Surgery, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 5Dept of Oncology and Oncohematology, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 6Department of Infectious Diseases, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, University Vita-Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy, 7Department of Infectious Diseases, Galliera Hospital, Genoa, Italy, 8Infectious Disease Unit “Santo Spirito Civil Hospital”, Pescara, Italy, 2National Institute for Infectious Diseases L. Spallanzani, IRCCS, Rome, Italy; 9Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Torino, Torino, Italy, 10Clinic of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Department of Health Sciences, University of Milan, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Milan, Italy, 11Institute for Global Health, University College London, London, UK
    13.15-14.00

    Con il supporto incondizionato di:

    HIV: same day treatment in real life

    The de-stigmatization of PHLWA and the process of normalization of HIV disease should not lead to the minimization of its relevance for both individuals and society. Behind the slogan "test and treat" lies this dualism: the virtuous promptness of care, the absolute protagonist of the virtuous mentioned path, should not be confused with the hasty beginning of a therapy that must be taken longlife. It is important that all the stakeholders discuss and find together the way to enhance the drive of T & T in the context of the high standards of care obtained in our country.

    Chair: A. Lazzarin

    Discussant: M.L. Cosmaro

    13.15 - 13.30 Same day treatment: the evidence
    G. Di Perri
    13.30 - 13.45 Same day treatment: the road map
    M. Andreoni
    13.45 - 14.00 Discussion on Symposium issues
    14.05-15.35

    Oral Communications

    Social and PLWHIV related issues

    Oral Communications

    Social and PLWHIV related issues

    Chairs: A. Cingolani, S. Mattioli, L.A.R. Rancilio

    14.05 - 14.15 OC 79Promoting migrant access to sexual and reproductive health services for sexual gender based violence (SGBV) prevention and response (Pro-access)
    K. Ceesay, D. Di Dio, S.B. Dhiab, G. Floridia, M.C. Longo, M. Manuli, D. Matheson, G. Petrelli, S. Reale, S. Scalzo, A.A. Sleemankhel, M.G. Di Benedetto, F. Bellissimo and L. Nigro for the ProAccess/LILA Volunteer Group
    Lega Italiana per la Lotta contro l'AIDS (LILA) - Catania
    14.17 - 14.27 OC 80Immigrated HIV Transgenders in Italy: clinical and neurocognitive outcome and needs
    C. Atzori, P. Meraviglia, L. Valsecchi, G. Rizzardini, D. Minisci, N. Marazzi
    Infectious Diseases Department, Luigi Sacco University Hospital, Milan, Italy
    14.29 - 14.39 OC 81Does material deprivation affect late HIV presentation? Analysis from data of Italian HIV-surveillance System, 2010-2016
    M. Dorrucci1, V. Regine2, P. Pezzotti1, L. Pugliese2, B. Suligoi2 and the Regional representatives of the Italian HIV Surveillance System3
    1Dipartimento Malattie Infettive, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Roma, 2Centro Operativo AIDS, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Roma, 3Regional representatives of the Italian HIV Surveillance System. Abruzzo: M. Di Giacomo, L. Scancella; Basilicata: F. Locuratolo, G. Cauzillo; Calabria: A.D. Mignuoli, D.G. Chirico; Campania: G. Borgia; Emilia Romagna: E. Massimiliani; Friuli Venezia Giulia: T. Gallo, C. Braida; Lazio: V. Puro, P. Scognamiglio, A. Mammone; Liguria: G. Icardi, P.L. Lai; Lombardia: M. Gramegna, D. Cereda; Marche: F. Filippetti; Molise: A. Prozzo; Piemonte: C. Pasqualini; Provincia Autonoma di Bolzano: L. Pagani, R. Binazzi; Provincia Autonoma di Trento: P. Lanzafame, L. Collini, D. Bassetti; Puglia: M. Chironna, D. Loconsole; Sardegna: M.A. Palmas; Sicilia: G. Dardanoni; Toscana: F. Voller, M. Puglia, L. Pecori; Umbria: A. Tosti, R. Papili; Valle d’Aosta: M. Ruffier, M.G. Verardo, A. Catania; Veneto: F. Russo, F. Da Re
    14.41 - 14.51 OC 82Exercising with the support of the SmartApp: results on physical fitness, metabolic profile and psychological parameters
    M. Bonato1,2, F. Turrini3, V. De Zan3, A. Meloni1, R. Caccia3, M. Plebani1, E. Brambilla1, A. Giordani3, C. Vitobello3, M. F. Piacentini4, A. La Torre1,2, G. Merati1,5, L. Galli3, P. Cinque3
    1Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy, 2IRCCS, Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, Milano, Italy, 3IRCCS, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy, 4Foro Italico University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 6IRCSS, Fondazione Don Carlo Gnocchi, Milan, Italy
    14.53 - 15.03 OC 83Analysis of efficacy, adherence and quality of life (QoL) of early proactive switch to Elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide (E/C/T/TAF) in patients with a primary HIV-1 infection (ESTER study)
    M. Camici, A. Mondi, P. Lorenzini, S. Ottou, A. Vergori, M.M. Plazzi, R. Bellagamba, S. Cicalini, A. Antinori, C. Pinnetti
    HIV/AIDS Clinical Unit, INMI Spallanzani, Rome
    15.05 - 15.15 OC 84Organization and activity of a vaccination service for HIV + people: ASST-FBF-Sacco experience
    P. Meraviglia1, C. Gulisano1, A. Ridolfo1, M.V. Cossu1, C. Negri1, D. Minisci1, L. Valsecchi1, A. Capetti1, L. Confalonieri1, C. Boriello2, M. Galli1, G. Rizzardini1
    1Department infection disease ASST-FBF-Sacco, Milan, 2UOC vaccination ASST-FBF-Sacco, Milan
  • Aula 201
    10.05-11.35

    Oral Communications

    Resistance. Is it still a problem?

    Oral Communications

    Resistance. Is it still a problem?

    Chairs: G. Antonelli, G. Palù, G. Poli

    10.05 - 10.15 OC 54Dynamics of HIV-1 drug resistance over the years 1999-2017 in isolates from perinatally infected individuals followed in Italy
    D. Armenia1,2, B Yagai2, A. Bertoli2, L. Palandri3, H. Tchidjou Kuekou4, F. Forbici5, R. Gagliardini5, M. Lichtner6, M. Andreoni7, A. Antinori5, F. Ceccherini Silberstein2, S. Bernardi4, C.F. Perno5,8, M.M. Santoro2
    1UniCamillus, Saint Camillus International University of Health Sciences, 2University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome, 3University of Parma, Parma, 4Children's Hospital Bambino Gesù, Rome, 5National Institute for Infectious Diseases L. Spallanzani, IRCCS, Rome, 6La Sapienza University Polo Pontino, Latina, 7University Hospital of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, 8University of Milan, Milan
    10.17 - 10.27 OC 55Evaluation of resistance profile and virological response in drug-naïve patients who start a first-line regimen containing an integrase inhibitor
    D. Armenia1,2, S. Nozza3, M.M. Santoro2, M.R. Parisi3, F. Maggiolo4, E. Focà5, C. Cerva6, S. Rusconi7, L. Gazzola8, F. Ceccherini-Silberstein2, C.F. Perno9, A. Lazzarin10, on behalf of the INIMAGE Study Group
    1UniCamillus, Saint Camillus International University of Health Sciences, Rome, Italy, 2University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome, Italy, 3Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Istituto Scientifico San Raffaele, Milano, Italy, 4Azienda Ospedaliera Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy, 5Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy, 6Infectious Diseases Unit, University Hospital of Rome "Tor Vergata", Rome, Italy, 7Infectious Diseases Unit, DIBIC “Luigi Sacco”, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 8Clinic of Infectious Diseases, San Paolo Hospital, Milan, Italy, 9University of Milan, Milan, Italy
    10.29 - 10.39 OC 56Impact of previous NRTIs resistance in HIV positive patients switched to DTG+2NRTIs under virological control
    A. Giacomelli1,2, A. Lai1, M. Franzetti3, F. Maggiolo4, S. Di Giambenedetto5, V. Borghi6, D. Francisci7, G. Magnani8, M. Pecorari9, L. Monno10, I. Vicenti11, L. Lepore12, F. Lombardi5, S. Paolucci13, S. Rusconi1,2 on behalf of ARCA collaborative group
    1III Infectious Disease Unit, ASST-FBF-Sacco, Milan, Italy, 2DIBIC L.Sacco, Univeristy of Milan, Milan, Italy, 3UOC Infectious Disease Unit, ASST-Lecco, Lecco, Italy, 4Department of Infectious Diseases, Azienda Ospedaliera Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy, 5Institute of Clinical Infectious Diseases, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Policlinico Gemelli, Rome, Italy, 6Infectious Diseases Clinic, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Policlinico, Modena, Italy, 7Clinical Infectious Diseases, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy, 8Infectious Disease Unit, Reggio Emilia, Italy, 9Unit of Microbiology and Virology, Modena University Hospital, Modena, Italy, 10Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, University of Bari, Italy, 11Department of Medical Biotechnology, University of Siena, Viale Bracci 2, 53100, Siena, Italy, 12Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, University of Bari, Italy, 13Molecular Virology Unit, Microbiology and Virology Department, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo , Pavia, Italy
    10.41 - 10.51 OC 57Impact of resistance mutations on virological efficacy of DTG-based maintenance two-drug regimens: an ARCA cohort study
    R. Gagliardini1, B. Rossetti2, D. Redi2,3, S. Modica3, F. Montagnani2,3, G. Zanelli2,3, S. Di Giambenedetto4, F. Lombardi4, M. Pecorari5, V. Borghi6, A. Callegaro7, V. Micheli8, M. Annovazzi Lodi9, A. De Luca2,3, M. Zazzi3
    1Lazzaro Spallanzani National Institute for Infectious Diseases IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 2Infectious Diseases Unit, AOU Senese, Siena, Italy, 3Department of Medical Biotechnologies, University of Siena, Siena, Italy, 4Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy, 5Unit of Microbiology and Virology, Modena University Hospital, Modena, Italy, 6Infectious Diseases Unit, Modena Hospital, Modena, Italy, 7Microbiology and Virology Unit, ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy, 8Unit of Clinical Microbiology and Virology, Luigi Sacco Hospital, ASST FBF-Sacco, Milan, Italy, 9Virologia Molecolare, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy
    10.53 - 11.03 OC 58In vitro analysis of doravirine activity on HIV-1 clones harboring multiple NNRTI resistance mutations
    F. Saladini1, F. Giammarino1, A. Giannini1, A. Boccuto1, F. Dragoni1, I. Vicenti1, R.W. Shafer2, M. Zazzi1
    1Department of Medical Biotechnologies, University of Siena, Siena, Italy, 2Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    11.05 - 11.15 OC 59Pretreatment HIV drug resistance and treatment failure in non-Italian HIV-1 infected patients enrolled in ARCA
    D.F. Bavaro1, D. Di Carlo2, B. Rossetti3, B. Bruzzone4, I. Vicenti5, E. Pontali6, A. Zoncada7, F. Lombardi8, S. Di Giambenedetto8, V. Borghi9, M. Pecorari10, P. Milini11, P. Meraviglia12, L. Monno1, A. Saracino1
    1Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, University of Bari Medical School, Bari, Italy, 2Pediatric Clinical Research Center “Romeo and Erica Invernizzi”, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 3Infectious Diseases Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Siena, Italy, 4Hygiene Unit, IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST , Genoa, Italy, 5Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Mediche, Università di Siena, Siena, Italy, 6Infectious Diseases Unit, Galliera Hospital, Genoa, 7Infectious Diseases, Istituti Ospedalieri, Cremona, Italy, 8Institute of Clinical Infectious Diseases, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Policlinico Gemelli, Rome, Italy, 9Clinica Malattie infettive, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria di Modena, 10Polyclinic of Modena, Modena, Italy, 11Infectious Diseases Unit, Macerata Hospital, Macerata, 121st Division of Infectious Diseases, ASST Fatebenefratelli-Sacco, Milan, Italy
    11.17 - 11.27 OC 60Evaluation of multidrug resistance over the last two decades in ART-experienced HIV-1 infected patients in the ARCA database
    F. Lombardi1, A. Giacomelli2, D. Armenia3,4, A. Lai5, A. Dusina1, A. Bezenchek6, L. Timelli6, F. Saladini7, F. Vichi8, P. Corsi9, G. Colao10, B. Bruzzone11, A. Callegaro12, A. Castagna13,14, M.M. Santoro4
    1Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Rome, 2Infectious Diseases Unit, DIBIC Luigi Sacco, University of Milan, Milan, 3UniCamillus, Saint Camillus International University of Health Sciences, Rome, 4Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome, 5Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences L. Sacco, University of Milan, Milan, 6IPRO - InformaPRO S.r.l., Rome, 7Department of Medical Biotechnologies, University of Siena, Siena, 8Unit of Infectious Diseases, Santa Maria Annunziata Hospital, Firenze, 9Infectious and Tropical Diseases Unit, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, 10Laboratory of Virology, Careggi Hospital, Florence, 11Hygiene Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera-Universitaria San Martino, Genoa, 12Department of Laboratory Medicine, ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, 13Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Istituto Scientifico San Raffaele, Milano, 14Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milano
    11.40-12.30

    Oral Communications

    Changing HIV epidemiology

    Oral Communications

    Changing HIV epidemiology

    Chairs: G. d'Ettorre, G. Nunnari

    11.40 - 11.50 OC 68Change of prevalence and factors associated with the risk of AIDS presentation in Italy over last decade (2009-2018)
    A. Antinori1, A. Mondi1, P. Lorenzini1, A. Cozzi-Lepri2, A. Cingolani3, A. Latini4, A. Saracino5, A. Bandera6, G. Marchetti7, C. Mussini8, E. Girardi9, A. D’Arminio Monforte7
    1HIV/AIDS Department, National Institute for Infectious Diseases "Lazzaro Spallanzani" IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 2Centre for Clinical Research, Epidemiology, Modelling and Evaluation (CREME), Institute for Global Health, UCL, London, UK, 3Infectious Diseases Unit, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy, 4STI/HIV Unit, San Gallicano Dermatologic Institute IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 5Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Bari, Policlinic Hospital, Bari, Italy, 6Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, School of Medicine and Surgery, University of Milan, Milan, Italy; Infectious Diseases Unit, Departement of Internal Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy, 7Clinic of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Department of Health Sciences, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 8Infectious Diseases Clinics, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Policlinico di Modena, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 9Clinical Epidemiology Unit, National Institute for Infectious Diseases "Lazzaro Spallanzani", IRCCS, Rome, Italy
    11.52 - 12.02 OC 69Non B subtypes are the major driver of HIV-1 transmission dynamics in North Italy over the years 2012-2018
    L. Colagrossi1, M.C. Moioli2, A. Nava3, S. Carta3, S. Chiappetta2, V. Costabile4, D. Motta2, L. G. Chianura2, R. Rossotti2, D. Fanti3, C.F. Perno3,5, M. Puoti2, C. Alteri3,5
    1Residency in Microbiology and Virology, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 2Infectious Diseases, ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milan, Italy, 3Chemical-clinical and Microbiological Analysis, ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milan, Italy, 4Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 5Department of Oncology and Hemato-oncology, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
    12.04 - 12.14 OC 70Multicenter phylogenetic analysis of acutely infected individuals shows that non-B subtypes are associated to transmission clusters in Italy
    L. Fabeni1, G. Bozzi2, I. Abbate3, G. Berno3, A. Muscatello2, L. Taramasso2, M. Fabbiani4, S. Nozza5, G. Tambussi5, S. Rusconi6, E. Focà7, C. Pinnetti3, G. D’Ettorre8, C. Mussini9, V. Borghi9, B.M. Celesia10, G. Madeddu11, A. Antinori3, A. Gori2, M.R. Capobianchi3, A. Bandera2 for the INACTION study group
    1University of Rome "Tor Vergata", Rome, Italy, 2IRCCS Ca Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico - University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 3National Institute for Infectious Diseases L. Spallanzani-IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 4Infectious Diseases Unit, IRCCS San Matteo Hospital Foundation, University of Pavia, 5Clinic of Infectious Diseases, San Raffaele Hospital, University Vita Salute, Milan, Italy, 6Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences “Luigi Sacco” Hospital, University of Milan, Italy, 7Division of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, University of Brescia, ASST Spedali Civili Hospital, Brescia, 8Infectious Diseases Unit, Umberto I Hospital, La Sapienza University, Rome, Italy, 9Clinic of Infectious Diseases, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena Hospital, Italy, 10Unit of Infectious Diseases, Garibaldi Hospital, Catania, Italy,11Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Unit of Infectious Diseases, University of Sassari
    12.16 - 12.26 OC 71Higher rate of virologic failure in African migrants compared with newly HIV- diagnosed natives and foreigners from other regions
    F. Lagi1, S. Tekle Kiros1, S. Di Giambenedetto2, F. Lombardi2, M. Pecorari3, V. Borghi4, L. Lepore5, L. Monno5, M. Setti6, V. Micheli7, P. Bagnarelli8, E. Paolini9, P. Cicconi10, A. Bartoloni1,11, G. Sterrantino1
    1Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, Florence Italy, 2Institute of Clinical Infectious Diseases, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Policlinico Gemelli, Rome, Italy, 3Microbiology and Virology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria di Modena, Modena, Italy, 4Department of Infectious Diseases, Università di Modena, Modena, Italy, 5Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, University of Bari, Italy, 6Clinic of Immunology and Internal Medicine, Ospedale Policlinico San Martino,Genoa,Italy, 7Microbiology and Virology Laboratory, L. Sacco Hospital, Milano, Italy, 8Virology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Ospedali Riuniti di Ancona, Ancona, Italy, 9Immuno-Ematology and Transfusion Medicine Service, Cremona Hospital, Cremona, Italy, 10Infectious Diseases, San Paolo H. Milan, Italy, 11Infectious and Tropical Diseases Unit, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy
    12.30-14.00

    Poster Discussion

    HIV co-morbidities

    Poster Discussion

    HIV co-morbidities

    Chairs: M. Borderi, P. Maggi

    12.30 - 12.35 PD 20Sexually transmitted infections knowledge in high risk populations
    S. Giaché1, L. Cotte2, C. Chidiac2
    1Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy, 2Infectious Diseases Department, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hôpital de la Croix-Rousse, Lyon, France
    12.38 - 12.43 PD 21Bioimpedance vectorial analysis (BIVA) usefulness in evaluating body composition changes in HIV-1 infected patients in course of ART
    D.F. Bavaro, P. Laghetti, R. Lattanzio, S. Lo Caputo, L. Monno, G. Angarano, A. Saracino
    Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, University of Bari Medical School, Bari, Italy
    12.46 - 12.51 PD 22Changes in bone mineral density switching from tenofovir disoproxil fumarate: a comparison between lamivudine plus dolutegravir versus FTC/TAF plus an integrase inhibitor
    A. Ciccullo1, A.P. Lassandro1, G. Baldin1, A. Emiliozzi1, D. Moschese1, C. Picarelli1, A. Dusina1, D. Farinacci1, S. Belmonti1, F. Lombardi1, A. Borghetti2, A. Pontecorvi3,4, S. Di Giambenedetto1,2
    1Institute of Infectious Diseases, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy, 2Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli IRCCS, UOC Malattie Infettive, Rome, Italy, 3Department of Endocrinology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy, 4Endocrinology Unit, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario "A. Gemelli' - IRCCS, Rome, Italy
    12.54 - 12.59 PD 23Annexin A1 plasma levels and cardiovascular risk score in HIV positive patients
    C. Ucciferri1, F. Vignale1, E. Costantini2, M. Pontolillo1, C. D’Angelo2, M. Reale2, J. Vecchiet1, K. Falasca1
    1Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine and Science of Aging, University “G. d’Annunzio” Chieti-Pescara, Chieti, 2Unit of Immunodiagnostic and Molecular Pathology, Department of Medical, Oral and Biotechnological Sciences, University “G. d’Annunzio”, Chieti- Pescara, Italy
    13.02 - 03.07 PD 24Plasma fibrinogen is associated with higher inflammation and subclinical atherosclerosis in HIV-1-infected patients on combination antiretroviral therapy
    L. Calza1, V. Colangeli1, M. Borderi1, A. Borioni1, F. Volpato1, I. Bon2, M.C. Re2, P. Viale1
    Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, 1Clinics of Infectious Diseases, 2Unit of Microbiology, S.Orsola Hospital, University of Bologna
    13.10 - 13.15 PD 25Impact of chemotherapy relative dose intensity (RDI) in treatment of HIV-associated lymphoma (HIV-L)
    V. Mazzotta, P. Lorenzini, C. Pinnetti, M. Bibas, A. Giannetti, A. Plazzi, A. Mondi, R. Gagliardini, A. Vergori, E. Grilli, S. Cicalini, F. Baldini, A. Grisetti, L. Alba, A. Antinori
    National Institute of infectious Disease Lazzaro Spallanzani, Rome
    13.18 - 13.23 PD 26Effect of alphafetoprotein on survival in HIV-infected patients with hepatocellular carcinoma
    E. Messina1,2, L. Galli1, G. Morsica1, H. Hasson1, S. Bagaglio1, S. Salpietro1, A. Lazzarin1, A. Castagna1,2, C. Uberti Foppa1,2
    1IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano, Italy, 2Vita Salute San Raffaele University, Milano, Italy
    13.26 - 13.31 PD 27The UCSD Performance-Based Skills Assessment is associated to cognitive performance in HIV positive population with very good immunological condition
    V. Delle Donne1, N. Ciccarelli2, A. Borghetti4, F. Lombardi4, A. Dusina4, D. Farinacci4, A. Emiliozzi4, E. Visconti4, E. Tamburrini1,4, M. Fabbiani3, S. Di Giambenedetto1,4
    1Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma Italia, Istituto di Clinica Malattie Infettive, 2Dipartimento di Psicologia, Università Cattolica di Milano, 3U.O. Malattie Infettive e Tropicali, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, 4Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Roma Italia, UOC malattie infettive
    13.34 - 13.39 PD 28Resting EEG-LORETA and CSF Biomarkers in Patients with HAND
    V. Pirriatore1, G. Noce2, A. Barco1, G. Stroffolini1, S. Orlando3, D. Vai3, A. Bianco3, M. Trunfio1, D. Imperiale3, S. Bonora1, G. Di Perri1, C. Babiloni4,5, A. Calcagno1
    1Unit of Infectious Diseases, Amedeo di Savoia hospital, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Torino, Torino, 2IRCCS SDN, Naples, Italy, 3Unit of Neurology, Ospedale Maria Vittoria, ASL “Città di Torino”, 4Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Rome "La Sapienza", Rome, 5IRCCS S. Raffaele Pisana and Cassino, Rome and Cassino, Italy
    13.42 - 13.47 PD 29Aging with HIV or getting infected at older age define two distinct groups of aged HIV patients
    F. Maggiolo, L. Comi, R. Teocchi, E. Di Filippo, A.P. Callegaro, M. Rizzi
    ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo
    14.05-15.35

    Poster Discussion

    Virology, Immunology and Basic science

    Poster Discussion

    Virology, Immunology and Basic science

    Chairs: M.R. Capobianchi, F. Ceccherini - Silberstein

    14.05 - 14.10 PD 39Pre-existing Psychiatric Comorbidities Predict Dolutegravir Discontinuation in people living with HIV
    M. Milesi1, A. Borghetti2, J. Cusato1, C. Alcantarini1, S. Bonora1, A. Ciccullo3, A. D’Avolio1, G. Di Perri1, S. Di Giambenedetto2,3, A. Calcagno1
    1Unit of Infectious Diseases, Amedeo di Savoia hospital, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Torino, Torino, 2 IRCSS, Fondazione Policlinico Gemelli, Rome, 3Institute of Clinical Infectious Diseases, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy
    14.13 - 14.18 PD 40Glecaprevir/pibrentasvir pharmacokinetics when co-administered with antiretroviral drugs in a cohort of HCV/HIV patients
    V. Pirriatore1, L. Marinaro1, R. Angilletta1, A. Palazzo1, A. Barco1, C. Alcantarini1, N. Forni1, C. Montrucchio2, M. Ferrara1, A. Lazzaro1, M. Tettoni1, A. De Nicolò3, A. D’Avolio3, A. Calcagno1, G. Di Perri1, S. Bonora1
    1Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Torino, Torino, Italy, 2Unit of Infectious Diseases, Cardinal Massaia Hospital, Asti, Italy, 3Interdepartmental Center for Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology (CIFACS), University of Torino, Torino, Italy
    14.21 - 14.26 PD 41Analysis of miRNAs in treated HIV-1 patients with different levels of viral suppression
    F. Falasca1, D. Di Carlo1, L. Mazzuti1, M. Calabretto1, L. Celani2, G. D’Ettorre2, I. Mezzaroma3, G. Antonelli1, O. Turriziani1
    1Department of Molecular Medicine, 2Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, 3Department of Translational and Precision Medicine; Sapienza University of Rome
    14.29 - 14.34 PD 42Prevalence of resistance mutations in a large cohort of perinatally HIV-1 infected patients
    R. Ungaro1, L. Taramasso1,2, B. Bruzzone3, I. Vicenti4, L. Galli5, V. Borghi6, D. Francisci7, M. Pecorari8, A. Zoncada9, A.P. Callegaro10, E. Paolini11, L. Monno12, S. Bonora13, A. Di Biagio14
    1University of Genoa, Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), Genova, 2Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milano, 3Hygiene Unit, Policlinico San Martino Hospital, Genova, 4Department of Medical Biotechnology, University of Siena, Siena, 5Department of Health Sciences, University of Florence, Pediatric Infectious Diseases Division, Anna Meyer Children's University Hospital, Firenze, 6Department of Infectious Diseases, University of Modena, Modena, 7Infectious Diseases Clinic, Department of Medicine, University of Perugia, Perugia, 8Microbiology and Virology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria di Modena, Modena, 9Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Cremona Hospital, Cremona, 10Microbiology and Virology Unit, ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, 11Unit of Immunohematology and Transfusional Medicine, Cremona Hospital, Cremona,12Infectious Diseases Unit, Bari Hospital, Bari, 13Infectious Diseases Unit, Amedeo di Savoia Hospital, University of Turin, Torino, 14Infectious Diseases Unit, Policlinico San Martino Hospital, Genova
    14.37 - 14.42 PD 43Some HIV-1 gp120 polymorphisms could be involved in resistance to Fostemsavir
    L. Fabeni1, B. Yagai1, G. Berno2, L. Carioti1, R. Salpini1, V. Svicher1, C.F. Perno3, M.M. Santoro1, F. Ceccherini-Silberstein1
    1Department of Experimental Medicine and Surgery, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome, Italy, 2Virology Unit, INMI L. Spallanzani, IRCCS, Rome Italy, 3Department of Oncology and Hemato-Oncology, University of Milan, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
    14.45 - 14.50 PD 44Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex genetic variation and macrophage polarization status influence phagolysosomal acidification during infection
    M. Chiacchiaretta1, N. Bresciani1, A. Agresti2, S. Zambrano2,4, D. Mazza3, F. Cugnata4, C. Tassan Din5, D.M. Cirillo1, P. Miotto1
    1Emerging Bacterial Pathogens Unit, Division of Immunology, Transplantation and Infectious Diseases, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milano, Italy, 2Chromatin Dynamics Unit, San Raffaele University and Scientific Institute, Milano, Italy, 3Cancer Imaging Unit, Experimental Imaging Center, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milano, Italy, 4Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milano, Italy, 5Infectious Diseases Clinical Department, Division of Immunology, Transplantation and Infectious Diseases, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milano, Italy
    14.53 - 14.58 PD 45Plasma and intracellular pharmacokinetics of cobicistat in the clinical setting
    M. Ferrara, A. Trentalange, C. Alcantarini, A. Lazzaro, N. Forni, A. Ianniello, V. Avataneo, A. D’Avolio, A. Calcagno, G. Di Perri, S. Bonora
    Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Torino, Torino
    15.01 - 15.06 PD 46Chronic infections balance inflammaging: immunity of centenarians with HIV or HCV
    G. Guaraldi1, G. Dolci1, S. De Biasi1, D. Lo Tartaro1, M. Nasi1, J. Milic1, C. Vaccari1, H. Santos2, I. Pintassilgo2, C. Martins2, C. Mussini1, A. Cossarizza1
    1University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 2Hospital Garcia de Orta, Lisbon, Portugal
    15.09 - 15.14 PD 47Maraviroc as a Latency Reversing Agent in cell line models
    I. Vicenti1, F. Dragoni1, M. Monti2,4, A. Giannini1, A. Ciabattini1, B. Rossetti3, A. De Luca1,3, D. Medaglini1, E. Montomoli2,4, M. Zazzi1
    1Department of Medical Biotechnologies, University of Siena, Siena, Italy, 2Department of Molecular and Developmental Medicine, University of Siena, Siena, Italy, 3Infectious Diseases Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Siena, Italy, 4VisMederi srl, Siena, Italy
    15.17 - 15.22 PD 48Role of boosted vs unboosted protease inhibitors on dolutegravir plasma and intracellular pharmacokinetic in dual therapy clinical setting
    M. Ferrara, L. Marinaro, C. Alcantarini, A. Barco, M. Milesi, M.C. Tettoni, A. Ianniello, A. De Nicolò, A. D’Avolio, A. Calcagno, G. Di Perri,
    S. Bonora

    Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Torino, Torino
  • Aula Malliani
    10.30-11.30

    Con il supporto incondizionato di:

    Innovation vs novelty

    Although the significant advances in HIV therapy in recent years, many treatment-related needs persist. New medicines are needed for a broad range of patients to ensure continued improvements in efficacy as well as other important areas for people living with HIV and physicians, such as tolerability, safety, long-term toxicity, resistance, drug drug interactions and convenience. In addition, recent results with pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for the prevention of HIV infection warrant further exploration of new delivery technologies to give people at greatest risk of HIV infection a number of prevention methods from which to choose.

    Chair: M. Galli

    10.30 - 10.50 The relevance of innovation in medicine
    G. Apolone
    10.50 - 11.10 Innovation in mechanism of action
    A. Castagna
    11.10 - 11.30 Innovation in therapeutic strategy
    D. Ripamonti
    11.40-12.40

    Effects of vitamin D deficiency and respiratory infections' prevention in HIV population

    Hypovitaminosis D is a very common disorder, regarding both Western and developing countries. A growing amount of data over the last years have shown vitamin D deficiency to be high prevalent among HIV-positive subjects. In addition to "classic" risk factors, such as female sex, low dietary intake, dark skin pigmentation and low sun exposure, HIV-related factors, including immune activation and antiretroviral adverse effects, may affect vitamin D status. We report an interventional, non-randomized experience of OM-85 BV immunization in a group of 104 HIV-infected subjects presenting recurrent seasonal respiratory bacterial infections. We compared the number of respiratory events, the use of antibiotics and the cost related to antibiotics before (2005-2006) and after (2008-2011) the introduction of such intervention. Respiratory infections dropped in all groups but in subjects with recurrent otitis, leading to a reduction in the use of antibiotics. This is the first report of the effect of OM-85 BV in vivo in HIV-infected subjects.

    11.40 - 12.00 Vitamin D deficiency in HIV infection: an underestimated and undertreated epidemic
    M. Borderi
    12.00 - 12.20 Four years of immunization with OM-85 BV to prevent respiratory infections
    A.F. Capetti
    12.20 - 12.40 Discussion on Expert Meeting issues
    12.45-14.00

    Poster Discussion

    Viral Hepatitis

    Poster Discussion

    Viral Hepatitis

    Chairs: A. Cascio, V. Esposito

    12.45 - 12.50 PD 30No changes in longitudinal evaluation of neurocognitive performance (NPA) in antiretroviral-treated HIV/HCV co-infected patients receiving Directly-Acting Antivirals (DAAs)
    S. Cicalini, A.C. Brita, P. Lorenzini, A. Vergori, E. Grilli, S. Menichetti, R. Gagliardini, A. Giannetti, A. Antinori, C. Pinnetti
    National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani, IRCCS, Rome
    12.53 - 12.58 PD 31Immune inflammation markers in HCV infected subjects with low liver fibrosis undergoing DAA treatment
    B. Kertusha, C. Mascia, P. Nijhawan, I. Pozzetto, L. Fondaco, A. Carraro, R. Marocco, S. Vita, C. Mastroianni, M. Lichtner
    Sapienza Università di Roma, Dipartimento di Malattie Infettive e Sanità Pubblica, Latina
    13.01 - 03.06 PD 32Virological patterns of HCV-patients with failure to the last generation pan-genotypic direct-acting antivirals
    M. Starace1, M. Pisaturo1, C. Minichini1, S. De Pascalis1, M. Macera1, L. Occhiello1, A. Di Fraia1, L. Alessio2, V. Messina2, E. Claar3, T. Ascione4, A. Marrone5, G. Brancaccio6, I. Gentile7, G. D’Adamo8, G.B. Gaeta1, N. Coppola1 HCV infection Campania group (CampC)
    1Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Mental and Physical Health and Preventive Medicine, University L. Vanvitelli, Naples, Italy, 2Infectious Diseases Unit, AO Caserta, Caserta, Italy, 3Internal Medicine Unit, Evangelical Hospital Villa Betania Naples, Italy, 4IX Interventional Ultrasound Unit for Infectious Diseases, AORN dei Colli, P.O. Cotugno, Naples, Italy, 5Internal Medicine, University of Campania L. Vanvitelli, 6Department of Molecular Medicine University of Padua, 7Infectious Diseases Unit, University Federico II, Naples, Italy, 8Internal Medicine Unit, P.O. Umberto I Nocera Inferiore
    13.09 - 13.14 PD 33The presence of specific mutations in HBsAg C-terminus correlates with lower HBsAg levels in vivo, interfere with HBsAg release in vitro and alter HBsAg structure in HBeAg-negative chronic HBV genotype D infection
    L. Piermatteo1, A. Battisti2, L. Carioti1, D. Di Carlo3, O.E. Anastasiou4, U.S. Gill2, L. Colagrossi5, A. Bertoli1, M. Aragri1, L. Fabeni1, A. Iuvara6, V. Malagnino7, C. Cerva7, M. Lichtner8, C.M. Mastroianni8, G.M. De Sanctis9, M. Paoloni10, M. Marignani11, C. Pasquazzi11, N. Iapadre12, T. Mari13, G. Parruti14, J. Vecchiet15, L. Sarmati7, M. Andreoni7, M. Angelico16, S. Grelli1,6, P. Kennedy2, J. Verheyen3, F. Ceccherini Silberstein1, C.F. Perno17, V. Svicher1, R. Salpini1
    1"Tor Vergata" University of Rome, Experimental Medicine, Rome, Italy, 2Barts Liver Centre, Blizard Institute, Barts and The London SMD, QMUL, London, United Kingdom, 3University of Milan, Paediatric Clinical Research Center 'Romeo and Enrica Invernizzi', Milan, Italy, 4Institute of Virology, University-Hospital, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany, 5University of Milan, Microbiology and virology, Milan, Italy, 6Tor Vergata University Hospital, Microbiology and Virology Unit, Rome, Italy, 7Tor Vergata University Hospital, Infectious Desease Unit, Rome, Italy, 8”Sapienza” University, Public Health and Infectious Disease, Rome, Italy, 9”Umberto I” University Hospital, Rome, Italy, 10“S.S. Filippo e Nicola” Hospital, Infectious Disease Unit, Avezzano, Italy, 11“S.Andrea Hospital”, Department of Gastroenterology, Rome, Italy, 12“San Salvatore Hospital”, L' Aquila, Italy, 13“Nuovo Regina Margherita” Hospital, Rome, Italy, 14Pescara General Hospital, Infectious Disease Unit, Pescara, Italy, 15University "G. d'Annunzio" Chieti-Pescara, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine and Science of Aging, Chieti, Italy, 16Tor Vergata University Hospital, Hepatology Unit, Rome, Italy, 17University of Milan, Oncology and Haemato-oncology, Milan, Italy
    13.17 - 13.22 PD 34Tackling the undiagnosed fraction: evidence-based public health guidance for integrated HBV, HCV and HIV testing in the EU/EEA
    A.K. Sullivan1,2, L. Combs3, L. Tavoschi4,5, S. Croxford2, S. Desai2, L. Mason6, M. Hoekstra7, V. Delpech2, S. Finne Jakobsen3, A.J. Amato-Gauci4, D. Raben3
    1Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom, 2Public Health England, United Kingdom, 3University of Copenhagen, Denmark, 4European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, Sweden, 5University of Pisa, Italy, 6Pallas health research and consultancy, The Netherlands, 7Freelance consultant
    13.25 - 13.30 PD 35Efficacy and safety of velpatasvir plus sofosbuvir regimen in HCV chronic patients without advanced liver disease naive to previous DAA therapy: a meta-analysis
    M. Pisaturo, A. Russo, L. Onorato, N. Coppola
    Department of Mental Health and Public Medicine – Infectious Diseases Unit. University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli
    13.33 - 13.38 PD 36Acceptability and effectiveness of a pragmatic comprehensive project of linkage to care from Addiction Services to Infectious Diseases Unit in HCV people who inject drugs
    A. Soria1, E. Colella1, E. Chiesa2, A. Cardia3, M. Bramani Araldi4, D. Leto3, G. Scaffidi4, S. Mancastroppa2, C. De Ferrari3, A. Caruso4, S. Marangon2, M. Pecoraro5, P. Columpsi1, B. Tinghino5, G. Galimberti2, G. Migliorino1, G. Lapadula1
    1Unit of Infectious Diseases, San Gerardo Hospital, ASST Monza, 2Addiction service (SERD) of Monza, ASST Monza, 3Addiction service (SERD) of Limbiate, ASST Monza, 4Addiction service (SERD) of Carate Brianza, ASST Vimercate, 5Service of Alcohol disorders and new addictions (NOA) of Seregno, ASST Vimercate
    13.41 - 13.46 PD 37DAAs based treatment for HIV/HCV coinfected patients: virological and metabolic outcomes in a real-life study
    L. Onorato1,6, L. Alessio1, V. Sangiovanni2, F. Borrelli3, E. Manzillo4, V. Esposito5, F. Simeone1, S. Martini6, N. Capoluongo2, S. Leone7, G. Di Filippo3, M. D’Abbraccio5, L. Aprea4, A. Salomone Megna8, E. Milano9, A. Saracino9, N. Coppola1,6
    1Infectious Diseases Unit, AORN Sant’Anna e San Sebastiano, Caserta, 2Third Infectious Diseases Unit, AORN dei Colli, P.O. Cotugno, Naples, 3Infectious Diseases Unit, University Federico II, Naples, 4IX Infectious Diseases Unit, AORN dei Colli, P.O. Cotugno, Naples, 5Department of Infectious Disease and Infectious Emergencies, General Infectious Diseases Unit, AORN dei Colli, P.O. Cotugno, Naples, 6Department of Mental Health and Preventive Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, University of Campania "L. Vanvitelli", Naples, 7Infectious Diseases Unit, A.O S.G. Moscati, Avellino, 8Infectious Diseases Unit, A.O G. Rummo, Benevento,9Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, University of Bari.
    13.49 - 13.54 PD 38Serious liver events and liver-related deaths in HIV/HCV co-infected patients with diabetes: data from the ICONA Foundation Cohort Study
    S. Leone1, P. Lorenzini2, A. Cozzi-Lepri3, G. Orofino4, D. Bernacchia5, A. Castagna6, M. Menozzi7, G. Guaraldi7, G. Madeddu8, A. Di Biagio9, A. Gori10, A. d'Arminio Monforte11, for the ICONA Foundation Cohort Study
    1Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, San Giuseppe Moscati Hospital, Avellino, Italy, 2National Institute for Infectious Diseases L. Spallanzani, Rome, Italy, 3Institute for Global Health, University College London, London, UK, 4Infectious Diseases Unit A, Amedeo di Savoia Hospital, Turin, Italy, 5Infectious Diseases Unit, ASST Fatebenefratelli-Sacco, DIBIC 'L. Sacco', University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 6Infectious Diseases Department, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute & Vita-Salute University, Milan, Italy, 7Clinic of Infectious Diseases, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 8Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy, 9Infectious Diseases Unit, Policlinico San Martino Hospital, Genoa, Italy, 10Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy and Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, School of Medicine and Surgery, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 11Clinic of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Department of Health Sciences, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
    14.05-15.35

    Poster Discussion

    HIV therapy and management

    Poster Discussion

    HIV therapy and management

    Chairs: P.M. Cinque, A. Di Biagio

    14.05 - 14.10 PD 49Durability and efficacy of dolutegravir-based 2 drug regimens in virologically suppressed patients: a real life clinical setting
    V. Micheli1, D. Rizzelli1, D. Mileto1, A. Mancon1, F. Romeri1, A. Giacomelli2, M.V. Cossu3, L. Oreni2, A.F. Capetti3, S. Rusconi2, M.R. Gismondo1
    1Laboratory of Clinical Microbiology, Virology and Bioemergencies, ASST Fatebenefratelli-Sacco, L. Sacco University Hospital, Milan, Italy, 2Infectious Diseases Clinic, DIBIC Luigi Sacco, University of Milano, Milano, Italy, 31st Division of Infectious Diseases, ASST Fatebenefratelli-Sacco, L. Sacco University Hospital, Milan, Italy
    14.13 - 14.18 PD 50Improvement of CD4/CD8 ratio in experienced patients switching to dolutegravir based dual therapies
    L. Taramasso1,2, A. Di Biagio3, E. Ricci2, N. Squillace4, R. Gulminetti5, G.V. De Socio6, B. Menzaghi7, G.C. Orofino8, G. Madeddu9, G. Pellicanò10, B.M. Celesia11, A. Bandera12, A. Gori12, P. Bonfanti13 on behalf of CISAI study group
    1Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), University of Genova, Genova, Italy, 2Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy, 3Infectious Diseases Unit, Policlinico Hospital San Martino, Genova, Italy, 4Infectious Diseases Unit ASST-MONZA, San Gerardo Hospital-University of Milano-Bicocca, Monza, 5Department of Medical Sciences and Infectious Diseases, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo -University of Pavia, 6Department of Internal Medicine 2, Infectious Diseases Unit, Perugia “Santa Maria della Misericordia” General Hospital, 7Unit of Infectious Diseases, ASST della Valle Olona – Busto Arsizio (VA), 8Division I of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, ASL Città di Torino, 9Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical, Surgical and Experimental Sciences, University of Sassari, Sassari, 10Department of Human Pathology of the Adult and the Developmental Age “G. Barresi”, Unit of Infectious Diseases, University of Messina, Messina, Italy, 11Unit of Infectious Diseases University of Catania ARNAS Garibaldi Catania, 12University of Milan, Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy, 13Unit of Infectious Diseases, A. Manzoni Hospital, Lecco
    14.21 - 14.26 PD 51Simplification to high-genetic-barrier 2DR in PLWH harbouring 4-class drug-resistant HIV-1 enrolled in the PRESTIGIO Registry
    D. Canetti1,2, L. Galli1, N. Gianotti1, A. Celotti3, L. Calza4, R. Gagliardini5, S. Rusconi6, S. Modica7,8, G. Cenderello9, M. Ferrara10, M. Santoro11, M. Zazzi8, A. Castagna1,2 on behalf of the PRESTIGIO Study Group
    1Clinic of Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele, Milano, Italy, 2Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milano, Italy, 3Università degli Studi di Brescia, Spedali Civili di Brescia, Brescia, Italy, 4Unit of Infectious Diseases, Policlinico Sant'Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna, Italy, 5National Institute for Infectious Diseases L. Spallanzani, IRCCS, Roma, Italy, 6Sacco Hospital, Infectious Diseases, University of Milan, Milano, Italy, 7Infectious Diseases Unit, AOU Senese, Siena, Italy, 8Department of Medical Biotechnologies, University of Siena, Siena, Italy, 9Infectious Diseases Department, Galliera Hospital, Genova, Italy, 10Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Torino, Torino, Italy, 11Department of Experimental Medicine and Surgery, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy
    14.29 - 14.34 PD 52A ductile dual therapy with enhanced genetic barrier for multi-experienced patients
    F. Maggiolo, L. Comi, E. Di Filippo, D. Valenti, A.P. Callegaro, M. Rizzi
    ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo
    14.37 - 14.42 PD 53Predictors of incomplete virologic response and virological failure in patients with acute HIV infection. Results of Italian Network of ACuTe HIV InfectiON (INACTION) cohort
    L. Taramasso1, M. Fabbiani2, G. Bozzi1, A. Muscatello1, S. Nozza3, I. De Benedetto4, M. Ripa3, R. Dell'Acqua3, A. Antinori5, C. Pinnetti5, A. Calcagno4, M. Ferrara4, E. Focà6, E. Quiros-Roldan6, D. Ripamonti7, M. Campus8, B.M. Celesia9, C. Torti10, L. Cosco11, A. Di Biagio12, S. Rusconi13, G. Marchetti14, C. Mussini15, R. Gulminetti2, A. Cingolani16, G. d’Ettorre17, N. Geremia18, G. Madeddu18, A. Franco19, G. Orofino20, N. Squillace21, A. Gori1,22, G. Tambussi3, A. Bandera22 on behalf of INACTION study group
    1Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda, Policlinico Maggiore Hospital, Milan, Italy, 2Infectious Diseases Unit, IRCCS San Matteo Hospital Foundation, University of Pavia, 3Clinic of Infectious Diseases, San Raffaele Hospital, University Vita Salute, Milan, Italy, 4Department of Medical Sciences, Unit of Infectious Diseases, University of Turin, Amedeo di Savoia Hospital, Turin, Italy, 5National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 6Division of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, University of Brescia, ASST Spedali Civili Hospital, Brescia, Italy, 7Infectious Disease Unit, ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy, 8Infectious Diseases Unit, SS Trinità Hospital, ASSL Cagliari, Italy, 9Unit of Infectious Diseases, Garibaldi Hospital, Catania, Italy, 10Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University “Magna Graecia”, Catanzaro, Italy, 11Infectious Diseases Unit, “Pugliese-Ciaccio” Hospital, Catanzaro, Italy, 12Department of Infectious Diseases, IRCCS AOU San Martino IST, (DISSAL), University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy, 13Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences “Luigi Sacco” Hospital, University of Milan, Italy, 14Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Department of Health Sciences, University of Milan, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Milan, Italy, 15Clinic of Infectious Diseases, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena Hospital, Italy, 16Institute of Clinical Infectious Diseases, Agostino Gemelli Hospital, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy, 17Infectious Diseases Unit, Umberto I Hospital, La Sapienza University, Rome, Italy,18Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Unit of Infectious Diseases, University of Sassari, Italy, 19Infectious Diseases Unit, ASP Siracusa, Italy, 20Unit of Infectious Diseases, Divisione A, Amedeo di Savoia Hospital, Turin, Italy, 21Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, ASST San Gerardo, Monza, Italy, 22Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda, Policlinico Maggiore Hospital, School of Medicine and Surgery, University of Milan, Italy
    14.45 - 14.50 PD 54Trends of Transmitted Resistance Mutations to Four Drug Classes and HIV-Subtypes Among Subjects Recently Diagnosed as HIV Infected Over 2004-2019
    M. Basso1, B. Parisatto1, C. Stagni1, R. Scaggiante2, M. Cruciani3, R. Ferretto4, V. Manfrin5, E. Francavilla6, S. Panese7, F. Dal Bello1, M. Andreoni8, G. Palù1, S. G. Parisi1
    1Department of Molecular Medicine, University of Padova, Italy, 2Infectious Diseases, Padova Hospital, Italy, 3Center of Diffusive Diseases, Verona, Italy, 4Clinical Infectious Diseases, Hospital of Santorso, Italy, 5Infectious Diseases, Vicenza Hospital, Italy, 6Infectious Diseases, Belluno Hospital, Italy, 7Infectious Diseases Unit, dell'Angelo Hospital, Venezia, Italy, 8Clinical Infectious Diseases, Tor Vergata University, Rome, Italy
    14.53 - 14.58 PD 55Presence of V72I, G123S and R127K Integrase Inhibitors polymorphisms could reduce cART effectiveness
    A. Celotti1, F. Gargiulo2, M. Properzi1, M.A. De Francesco2, E. Quiros-Roldan1, I. Izzo1, M.C. Pezzoli1, A. Caruso2, F. Castelli1, E. Focà1
    1Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, University of Brescia and ASST Spedali Civili Hospital, Brescia, 2Institute of Microbiology, Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Brescia and ASST Spedali Civili Hospital, Brescia
    15.01 - 15.06 PD 56Trend of estimated glomerular filtration rate in a large cohort of HIV mother-to-child infected patients, an observational multicenter study from 2010 to 2018
    G. Sarteschi1,2, A. Celotti3, M. Mirabella1,2, A. Della Vecchia1,2, S. Mora4, M. Giacomini4, E. Focà3, A. Di Biagio1
    1Infectious Diseases Unit, IRCCS Policlinico San Martino Hospital, Genoa, 2Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), University of Genoa, Genoa, 3Infectious and Tropical Diseases Department, University of Brescia and ASST Spedali Civili Hospital, Brescia, 4Department of Informatics Bioengineering, Robotics and Systems Engineering (DIBRIS), University of Genoa, Genoa
    15.09 - 15.14 PD 57Vitamin D insufficiency is associated with subclinical atherosclerosis in HIV-1-infected patients on combination antiretroviral therapy
    L. Calza1, V. Colangeli1, M. Borderi1, B. Granozzi1, P. Malosso1, I. Bon2, M.C. Re2, P. Viale1
    Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, 1Clinics of Infectious Diseases, 2Unit of Microbiology, S.Orsola Hospital, University of Bologna
    15.17 - 15.22 PD 58Predicting 2-drug antiretroviral regimen efficacy by genotypic susceptibility score: results from a cohort study
    B. Rossetti1, S. Modica2, R. Gagliardini3, D. Redi1,2, F. Montagnani1,2, G. Zanelli1,2, S. Di Giambenedetto4, F Lombardi4, M. Pecorari5, V. Borghi6, P. Meraviglia7, F. Maggiolo8, V. Micheli9, M. Zazzi2, A. De Luca1,2 on behalf of ARCA study group
    1Infectious Diseases Unit, AOU Senese, Siena, Italy, 2Department of Medical Biotechnologies, University of Siena, Siena, Italy, 3Lazzaro Spallanzani National Institute for Infectious Diseases IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 4Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy, 5Unit of Microbiology and Virology, Modena University Hospital, Modena, Italy, 6Infectious Diseases Unit, Modena Hospital, Modena, Italy, 7First Division of Infectious Diseases, ASST Fatebenefratelli-Sacco, Milan, Italy, 8Infectious Diseases Unit, Bergamo Hospital, Bergamo, Italy, 9Unit of Clinical Microbiology and Virology, ASST Fatebenefratelli-Sacco, Milan, Italy

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